Obsessive with accuracy.

I need my watch as close to perfectly in tuned with ‘atomic time’ as possible. Anything more than a five second deviation irks me. Particularly on a work day, but still on the weekends too. I will reset my mechanical watches daily to get them in line. additionally I need the minute hand lined up at the indices perfectly. My Timex Q is cool looking but after setting it the minute hand jumps a tiny bit and ruins the whole thing. My other Timex, the auto Marlin doesn’t have hacking and that really bugs me. On the other hand my Bulova Lunar Pilot is so beautifully accurate I have to love it. How obsessive are you with accuracy for your watches? I get into it with both my quartz and mechanical watches. 

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I'm not not obsessive at all. What you should do is get a "Radio-Controlled" watch that will always be spot on if you get the signal regularly and within 5 secs even if you only get the signal a couple times a month. I get a regular signal and I'm on the east coast.

I've noticed the jumping minute hand on certain, but not all ,Timexes and it drives me nuts too. But not to the point of not wearing. Also-there are ways to hack the Miyota non hacking movements aside from "back hacking". I do it all the time.

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I’m not obsessive over accuracy, tho I have one watch that doesn’t have hacking and I do find that jarring whenever I go to set it. That said, I’m not doing anything mission critical that requires to the second accuracy, and even if I were, seems like it’d be a good day to strap on the G-Shock.

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I'm obsessive enough about it that I plunked the money down on a spring drive to satisfy my desire for a mechanical watch with a high degree of accuracy. My Seiko LX only gains about 2 seconds a month, which actually makes it better than any of the quartz watches in my collection that don't have Bluetooth sync or atomic time correction.

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It's absolutely more accurate than I need it to be, but it's a nice thing to have. I can only really tolerate about 10 seconds of deviation at most and with this watch, I could easily leave it alone for months before having to adjust it.

At some point I fully intend to get a Grand Seiko with a 9F high accuracy quartz movement. Those are rated to be accurate to within +/- 10 seconds a year, which will satisfy my desire for precision time keeping when it comes to non-radio controlled quartz watches.

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I am trying to worry about it less, I might even sell my timegrapher so I quit testing watches. 

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If I'm within 2 minutes I'm ok.  Sometimes a seiko will be 5 min off after awhile and I'll adjust it.  My GW-5000u is what I set all my watches to so I guess technically I do have something that is hyper accurate.   I find I use my watches more as a relative need to be somewhere, rather than worrying if the second hand crosses the 12 at the right time.  Poor eyesight also means sometimes I'm setting a watch where I can't really see the time if I didn't put my glasses in.

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foghorn

I'm not not obsessive at all. What you should do is get a "Radio-Controlled" watch that will always be spot on if you get the signal regularly and within 5 secs even if you only get the signal a couple times a month. I get a regular signal and I'm on the east coast.

I've noticed the jumping minute hand on certain, but not all ,Timexes and it drives me nuts too. But not to the point of not wearing. Also-there are ways to hack the Miyota non hacking movements aside from "back hacking". I do it all the time.

I’ve considered radio controlled just have not found one that speaks to me. It almost feels like the watch is cheating. 

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cageyjames

If I'm within 2 minutes I'm ok.  Sometimes a seiko will be 5 min off after awhile and I'll adjust it.  My GW-5000u is what I set all my watches to so I guess technically I do have something that is hyper accurate.   I find I use my watches more as a relative need to be somewhere, rather than worrying if the second hand crosses the 12 at the right time.  Poor eyesight also means sometimes I'm setting a watch where I can't really see the time if I didn't put my glasses in.

I Am Chaos Finneas GIF - I Am Chaos Finneas Kate Mckinnon GIFs

I’m notifying the authorities. 

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Ha, none of my five mechanical watches hack, so I'm liberated there. Quartz drifts to some extent and this does annoy me when it is noticed. 

If you have two or more digital watches with an hourly chime, turn them both on and synchronize. First of all, you'll notice that sub-second precision is impossible. They'll never chime at the same instant. Then, throughout a couple weeks or more, you can hear them drift apart till there are a couple seconds lag between the chimes. 

Ideally, hell yes I want set it and forget it perfect accuracy. I agree that about five seconds is tolerable, but much more than that (on a quartz) and it's getting reset. Laying a bunch of running watches together where you can see the hands in alignment to the second is a fleeting joy. Seeing asynchronization is dissatisfaction.

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I usually wear a different watch everyday so I set it 1 minute fast in the morning if it’s an automatic/mechanical. If it’s quartz I don’t think twice. 

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Problem solved 👍

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It's fun knowing you have a really accurate mechanical watch but I'm not too bothered if it's fast or slow. 

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Not at all.  The difference between 5 seconds off and 50 a day really has zero impact.  And I'm not into the technological challenges related to the tiny improvements in timekeeping.  I value other things so it just doesn't rank...

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Does this answer your question?

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I'm a stickler for accuracy as well. I have absolutely no need to have up to the second accuracy, but as far as I'm concerned the primary job of a watch (at least originally) was to show the time, and I feel that being able to do so accurately is a sign of a well made watch. I have different expectations for quartz watches than I do for mechanicals.

Most of my mechanical watches are COSC or METAS certified, and run well within 2-3 seconds per day. My best mechanical is my GMT Master II, which consistently runs <+1SPD.  I'm generally OK with anything better than 6 SPD, but the more accurate, the happier I am with the watch.

I also like having the minute hand line up perfectly so that it hits the appropriate marker when the seconds hand reaches the 12. Most of my watches don't have any "jitter", so that when I hack them and set the minute hand, there is no significant movement when I push the crown in. I do have some watches that always seem to take a few seconds before the minutes hand starts moving. My Norqain Adventure Sport chrono keeps time within +2SPD, but when setting it, I need to set the minute hand about a quarter of a minute fast in order to have the hands lining up properly.

My most accurate quartz watch is my Omega Speedmaster Skywalker X-33. When I purchased that one, I set the phase elapsed timer, so that I could see how much time it was gaining/losing over time. The PE1 timer currently shows that the watch has been running for 141 days, during which time it has gained only 1 second, which extrapolates to a gain of less than 3 seconds per year, which I find extremely impressive. 

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Each to his own. I do not recommend you take up fishing. 

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I measure the accuracy of my watches almost daily using an app called Twixt. I always compare my mechanical watches to atomic time but only reset them to atomic time maybe once or twice a month. I like to see how different power levels and positions affect accuracy. I tend to notice rather quickly if a watch isn’t running within COSC parameters. Sadly, I’ve had to send in three watches (Rolex Yacht-Master, Tudor BB58, and Tudor Heritage BB 41) this year for warranty service because they were constantly running way out of COSC spec. All of them were losing close to -10 sec per day. 
 

The following are screen shots of the app Twixt where I measure the accuracy of the watches in my “daily” rotation. 
 

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