Heart says yes, but head says no...

So...i think i am not the only one struggling with this situation sometimes.

I have the opportunity to buy one of my grail watches at a pretty decent price. But it is still a lot of money. And now i am struggling with the question, if i should get what i lust after, or if i should be reasonable this time. 

I mean, i could also use the money for other things... or maybe buying some watches at a lower price point.

But i also dont wanna end up spending the same amount of money in other things/watches, while i still crave that one particular piece...

Do you guys feel me?

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Yes, I'm finding that my $300-$1,200 watches give me just as much satisfaction as my $4,000 watch. My interest in Rolex, Omega, etc., has faded somewhat due to the large diminishing returns in this area of totally unnecessary spending. Luxury watches have a high opportunity cost.

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gbelleh

Yes, I'm finding that my $300-$1,200 watches give me just as much satisfaction as my $4,000 watch. My interest in Rolex, Omega, etc., has faded somewhat due to the large diminishing returns in this area of totally unnecessary spending. Luxury watches have a high opportunity cost.

To me, it isnt even about the name on the dial. It is just that particular watch. I also have an eye on the Smiths Everest PRS-25, but that watch is almost as hard to get as a Rolex...

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I don’t see any problem with trying to score a hard to get item, especially if it’s not a financial burden. As long as it isn’t an obsession to the detriment of other responsibilities, and you’re willing to be patient. 

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Yes I finally bite the bullet, bought a Rolex no date sub, wanted one forever. You know what? Live is short! Buy the watch! 

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What are your financial goals? Is it to retire by a certain age? Will spending $7,700 now ($188k in 30 years pre-tax assuming growth rate of 10.7%) derail you from retiring at that age? For some people it’s okay, for others it’s not 

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I can totally relate to this quandry. I faced the same thing before I bought my Omega (my first, "big" watch purchase). I always wanted an Omega because I've lusted after them for years and because buying one would have signified to me that I've reached a level of success in my career that justified the purchase. But I'm such a practical person that I struggled with the decision for a long time. Like the thread starter, I didn't want to buy multiple cheaper watches to fill that void. I think I am in the minority on this, but I don't get the same enjoyment from my cheaper watches relative to what I get from my more expensive pieces. I wear my Omega and my Oris 85% of the time and I do that because they are the most comfortable, tell the most accurate time (other than my quartz pieces of course) and are the most interesting to look at. Quite frankly, they justify the price I paid for them.

Putting myself in the author's shoes, I would buy the watch. I don't think they will regret it.

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If by ”other things” you mean things you actually need (car, nice clothes for work, etc), then I wouldn’t buy it. But if you’re mentioning other watches I don’t think that’s what you mean. Quality over quantity. I’d get the watch you really love over the multiple watches at lower price points that you won’t want as much and will probably regret. But the fact that you’re not sure at this moment, I’d probably wait before buying any watches until you’re sure. 

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gbelleh

Yes, I'm finding that my $300-$1,200 watches give me just as much satisfaction as my $4,000 watch. My interest in Rolex, Omega, etc., has faded somewhat due to the large diminishing returns in this area of totally unnecessary spending. Luxury watches have a high opportunity cost.

I wish I could say the same, but I somehow have the urge to make the next watch an even "better" watch. I wish my cheaper watches would make me as happy as the expensive ones, but as soon as I wear my Oris, I want to switch to e.g. my IWC within an hour.

This sounds super snobby I guess, but I’m not able to change that. I don‘t have a gatekeeper mentality, I don’t judge or exclude others by the price of their watch or the like, I don’t wear my watches to show off, I rather cover them with my sleeve when in public,… When it comes to my own watches I’m super weird 😞

The only cheap watches I love are my G-Shock and the MoonSwatches. But the middle ranges (Tissot, Alpina, Oris, …) don‘t get much wrist time.

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I try to really buy anything that I think I cant afford.  I don't make impulse buys. Sleep on it.

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I’d personally rather buy the one more expensive watch that I really crave instead of many mid-range watches that I end up selling with a loss anyway. But since I’ve joined WC I found, that I belong to a minority with this opinion and I’m totally not mad about that. I think it’s a virtue to enjoy every watch on the same level.

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gbelleh

Yes, I'm finding that my $300-$1,200 watches give me just as much satisfaction as my $4,000 watch. My interest in Rolex, Omega, etc., has faded somewhat due to the large diminishing returns in this area of totally unnecessary spending. Luxury watches have a high opportunity cost.

I personally don't have a $4000 watch, but I found myself absolutely loving watches that don't come with the opportunity cost associated with spending $8K.

A $1K CW gives me great wearing pleasure, and the other $7K can be used for other hobbies. 

Also, sometimes what we think we want isn't actually what we want once we have it. 

I dreamed about buying a Subaru WRX  for years, then finally I bought one after I got divorced (YOLO). I was over the moon for about three weeks, and then it started failing to live up to what I had hyped it up to be. Young women(I was 25) weren't impressed by it, and while fun to drive, I had the police watching me like a hawk. After 6 months I traded it at a massive loss... 

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The time to buy is when you see it.

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Oh I feel you. I think every person has to have "that limit." And I am not referring to the amount of money you have in your savings. I am talking about the "price of reasonability." There is a difference between splurging and reckless spending, but it is a fine line. 

If this is a splurge for you, then I say go for it. The Explorer is a fantastic watch that I hope to own some day. But if your closest family and friends (the ones that truly know you) advise you that it is a reckless buy, then I would wait. You want to be able to enjoy your watch and not feel the financial regret every time you look at it. 

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My 2 cents: Buy it. Buy it and enjoy it, and if you find out you don't like it you can always sell it on the used market at close to MSRP

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watchesandespresso

I wish I could say the same, but I somehow have the urge to make the next watch an even "better" watch. I wish my cheaper watches would make me as happy as the expensive ones, but as soon as I wear my Oris, I want to switch to e.g. my IWC within an hour.

This sounds super snobby I guess, but I’m not able to change that. I don‘t have a gatekeeper mentality, I don’t judge or exclude others by the price of their watch or the like, I don’t wear my watches to show off, I rather cover them with my sleeve when in public,… When it comes to my own watches I’m super weird 😞

The only cheap watches I love are my G-Shock and the MoonSwatches. But the middle ranges (Tissot, Alpina, Oris, …) don‘t get much wrist time.

I get it. I have a hard time wearing my budget watches after buying an IWC. The quality difference is very noticeable. Once you get a luxury watch it can be hard to go back to affordables.

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