Bremont in the Financial Times. It's bleaker than we thought.

Bremont changes design language to seek a wider appeal

Under new management, the UK watchmaker’s latest models are focusing on more general concepts of adventure, aimed at younger buyers

www.ft.com

A lot of interesting information on the affairs and ownership of the company here in this article. It's quite eye opening really.

Things seem bleaker than I imagined for the brand if you are a fan.

To summarize:

The English brothers no longer own a majority share of the company and hence have lost control over the direction of the brand and company.

The in house movement that the brothers wanted to bring to all of the time pieces will now be reserved for a small niche segment of their offering. New movements will be imported from Switzerland.

The trip tic case construction is to be slashed, as are 40% of the models that were in the lineup before this rebrand.

The "Britishness" of the brand is to be "expressed much more through exploration, designs, colours and references to the golden days of British watchmaking.”

Thoughts?

Reply
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So cushion case stuff, like Farer is already doing?

I don't know about "brand" identity, all I know is how cool their unit watches are tbh.

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That sucks that they are now minority shareholdersz

I can’t speak of the cases, because I’m not familiar with much of the brand. The logo emblem change feels unnecessary.

That “Britishness” part I don’t see much of a problem with.

Honestly, while I think in-house movements can be interesting, I am glad those are being scaled back. For the sake of customers, every big brand doing it on their own just won’t be good for the long term. Collaboration and sharing would be much better. I think people forget that specialization for movement manufacturing exists for good reasons and yields good results.

“Gender boundaries have completely fallen in recent years, and designing a watch linked specifically to men or women doesn’t even seem appropriate now,” he explains.

I agree in spirit but it’s also true that traditionally feminine models sell because those are still the watches many women want. I would still have some in there while making the main collection available and inclusive to them.

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I don't like rebrands and so this feels a bit odd. I may be biased because I think those new watches are ugly.

Trip tic case seemed like a signature thing, thought that was the best thing about them. I understand the move away from the Horage movements, they are probably too expensive and that isn't what sells watches to the masses.

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Bremont is a brand I’d love to support but I honestly can’t think of a single model in their directory that stands out. I can’t picture any specific watch in my mind when I think of them. It’s not that I dislike them, I just don’t like any of them enough to want to buy one.

As someone that does/has own/owned at least 25 different watch brands, the fact that Bremont hasn’t been one is quite remarkable. Perhaps the brand under new stewardship will find a way to make their products more appealing to more consumers?

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This feels like the wrong pivot. These new pieces feel really generic and characterless to me.

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I quite like the look of the new Terra Nova, but at $4600 CAD before taxes, I will never own one.

I think Bremont suffers from being in a very competitive segment of the market, and they don't have the "history" or marketing budget to make themselves a more well known brand.

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I don't think their watches offer enough for the price point, which is a shame. It's a brand I've wanted to buy into but haven't found the right watch and can't commit to their asking prices.

I'm even less likely to get one now they've changed the logo. I wish them all the best.

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tiffer

Bremont is a brand I’d love to support but I honestly can’t think of a single model in their directory that stands out. I can’t picture any specific watch in my mind when I think of them. It’s not that I dislike them, I just don’t like any of them enough to want to buy one.

As someone that does/has own/owned at least 25 different watch brands, the fact that Bremont hasn’t been one is quite remarkable. Perhaps the brand under new stewardship will find a way to make their products more appealing to more consumers?

Love the Wright Flyer ...... the price kept me away from buying one.

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CdeFmrlyCasual

That sucks that they are now minority shareholdersz

I can’t speak of the cases, because I’m not familiar with much of the brand. The logo emblem change feels unnecessary.

That “Britishness” part I don’t see much of a problem with.

Honestly, while I think in-house movements can be interesting, I am glad those are being scaled back. For the sake of customers, every big brand doing it on their own just won’t be good for the long term. Collaboration and sharing would be much better. I think people forget that specialization for movement manufacturing exists for good reasons and yields good results.

“Gender boundaries have completely fallen in recent years, and designing a watch linked specifically to men or women doesn’t even seem appropriate now,” he explains.

I agree in spirit but it’s also true that traditionally feminine models sell because those are still the watches many women want. I would still have some in there while making the main collection available and inclusive to them.

Or does it? Good chance they sold well. Maybe stinks for brand identity. I really appreciate their pre-change line-up and there are great deals to be had used.

On the otherhand, their marketing and website is not great and intentionally vague in places it should not be.

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Honestly if they just kept the name and made some more affordable (say £1200-£1500) basic watches with swiss movements they could probably make a killing as a mall brand 🤷