How many is too many?

This arrived today.  I have three more on the way.  One is new, two are vintage. I can go weeks without repeating wearing a watch. If the watchmaker calls this week I will be able to wear a different watch every day of the month.

That's not a humble brag, it is a cry for help.  I know that some of you have hundreds of watches. You are too far gone. This is for the rest of you.  There are diminishing returns. There is less satisfaction for your third or fourth of a brand. I started this because I enjoyed the history of the industry and how it shaped our world. The pieces are of secondary interest.

I am going to shrink this little collection of old watches and endeavor to enjoy each one a little more.  And just maybe, I will buy a luxury watch.  It is not about money, I have that.  It is about volume.

So, the picture is of a Voumard 2000. It is a weird modular back winder.  It was supposed to be for parts or repair but it has been keeping time for the last eight hours. I will give it a whirl when I get a proper 19mm strap on it. This is the back:

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Here is a deep thought by Richard Hell:

"Only time can write a song that's really, really real
The most a man can do is say the way its playing feels
And know he only knows as much as time to him reveals."

Go find the song "Time" and play it loudly.

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I hear you loud and clear with the too many - I don’t have a ridiculous amount - but i have a hard time unloading the cheepies (which are still cool imo) but they accumulate fast . And guess what one on the way too…

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Yeah I reached this epiphany of collecting for various reasons and realised I couldn't enjoy them all. Now I'm only willing to spend money on things that are ultra desirable, rather than just interesting.

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Time for an intervention! get a Casio! once you get one in black you will never go back. You must need a wall of those spinny windup things and a watchmaker on speed dial.

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They help keep your sanity and their just so cool. I've stalled at 35 I think?

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I think that variety is great. Different looks for different occasions, outfits, events. I'm definitely going down that collecting path. 

What I dont get (and try to avoid) is 3 or more watches that look very similar. Like I see some collections posted and 6 of the 8 watches in the box look VERY similar. Same style, face, color scheme, etc. I dont get that. But thats just me.

I realize that many watches and spectrum of looks to match what I'm wearing/doing means less wrist time for each  one, but I also see it as less wear on each  watch, and hopefully a longer mint look for them. That's my take on it.

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You cannot be the world archive of every watch ever made, so what do you want your collection to be? In what way is the new watch you contemplate buying really adding to the collection? By forcing yourself to answer that question you might be able to slow down the madness.

Cannot say that has worked for me yet, as I bought five watches last week, but at least these were adding things I didn't have before: a world timer, a field watch with strong lume, an annual calendar watch, a super-thin quartz, a watch with a micro-rotor movement. The gaps I find desirable to fill are now getting smaller: a watch with an alarm complication would be nice, perhaps a nice sector dial watch. Going forward, some watch types could perhaps do with an upgrade.

That way, you can keep the hobby going without going bonkers.

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It is an odd point where you get to one a day for a month or one a week for the year. I’ve been enjoying the Cyma I picked up the other day quite a lot, and I was really into the Cooper I grabbed earlier this year, a watch can grab you at any point and sometimes you just dont know why and it makes this really unpredictable. I’m also rediscovering watches within my collection again, like the Majex which got a new strap and is back on rotation, so I’m not sure if I can impart any wisdom. I think I will be cutting the collection quite dramatically, there are things that are now really falling by the wayside, and it’s hard to see how I can justify their presence. 
oh, and the answer is 6. I ran out of fingers on one hand whilst typing this so I will just say 6 and assume that everyone will agree with that.

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If this is you choosing your watch of the day you know you have too many.

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I think I could easily be you one day, but I do try hard to be strict with myself. I tell myself that it's ok to admire/respect/desire a watch and not need to own it. Sometimes this self talk works.... other times not so much. There are some serious flippers out there that I have come across on other forums, and threads where you can post pictures of the watch you currently desire so others can roast it and put you off buying them (so helping you control the spending). There can certainly be an addictive element to it all, with the anticipation mostly I think.

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I have a strong and real fear that I might head down this path as well. So far been toeing the line. 

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Is there such a thing as too many Oris watches? | WatchUSeek Watch Forums

As many as your wrist can handle 😉

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donchoco
Is there such a thing as too many Oris watches? | WatchUSeek Watch Forums

As many as your wrist can handle 😉

Ah - not quite elbow deep. You wait till you try and get them round your belly, that’s where the true collectors are.

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Deeperblue

I think I could easily be you one day, but I do try hard to be strict with myself. I tell myself that it's ok to admire/respect/desire a watch and not need to own it. Sometimes this self talk works.... other times not so much. There are some serious flippers out there that I have come across on other forums, and threads where you can post pictures of the watch you currently desire so others can roast it and put you off buying them (so helping you control the spending). There can certainly be an addictive element to it all, with the anticipation mostly I think.

It was the addictive side that prompted the post. I had just bought a watch that I liked, but didn't love, and certainly didn't need. I was "watch sick" (not as serious as "dope sick"). I deleted all the things that I was watching in my eBay queue. Realizing that I had many more pictures of watches than my children on my phone I deleted those as well.

Usually waiting a couple of weeks to pull the trigger keeps me from buying on impulse. So, no pilot watches, blue dials, field watches that I only think that I need, I can wait. The problem is the inexpensive curiosities that can be had for a simple bid. That Voumard cost less than I normally spend on lunch, but it looks like any number of other things that I already own.  It is unique, but only in ways that I and few others know and can possibly care about.

Two further thoughts: 1) as a overgeneralized proposition, I receive more insightful comments from the other side of the Atlantic than I do from over here. It is always worth waiting to hear what you have to say when you wake up; 2) loud punk music in short doses resets the brain. British punk music was written by anarchists. American punk music was written by poets. So, when you need a reset find some Richard Hell and the Voidoids and let them fix your brain.

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It is a good idea to wind all your watches once a week if you are keeping them in a safe. I rotate my watch every Monday, and I wind all the watches in my collection at the same time. This makes sure the oils are in the right place, and you don't damage your watches when you wear them weeks/months apart. I don't get to repeat a watch for couple of months, so by winding them once a week I hope to keep them healthy. 

What attracts me are the dials, and the finish, the craftsmanship. Collecting is a disease, and the disease is cured only when the patient dies. 

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I have about half as many as the OP, and somewhere around ten or a dozen I started realizing it was excessive. I'm not an impulse buyer, and I'm pretty satiated, but these family vintage watches keep appearing and I feel obligated to revive them, plus they're great. I have a couple watches that I'm just waiting to give away.

The advice with thrift shopping was to ask yourself when and where you would wear the item. It's fine to have a couple once-a-year seasonal items, but you don't want redundancy or to be overwhelmed in impractical items that never see the light of day. Limit the novelty items.

Honestly, rotation is kind of a chore, and it reveals less preferred watches. That's the tipping point, where you realize that less favored items are being worn solely out of guilt or duty. Separating joy of ownership and joy of use becomes an issue here.  

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i would ask same question to @chronotriggered how many is too many? 😂