What's your (in)accuracy tolerance?

For my non-HAQ quartz watches (rated at +/-15 s/month), I'm happy at +/- 5 s/month. For my non-chronometer mechanical watches (rated -20 to +40 spd), I'm happy with +/- 10 spd. I have a Timex MK1 Mechanical that was +7 spd for the first few months, but has drifted now to about +12 spd 馃え

Image

Am I being overly harsh expecting more from a cheap movement?

I change my watch every day so I am much more tolerant on accuracy. 聽As long as I'm not gaining or losing minutes a day its fine. 聽I do check the accuracy though.

Manufacturer stated policy divided by two, for me. 聽My thinking is that if manufacturers aren鈥檛 applying that kind of psychological thinking, then they鈥檙e bloody idiots. 聽

I think +/- 10 seconds per day is a pretty high standard for a cheap mechanical movement. My more expensive Swiss mechanical watches are about that accurate, my Seamaster 300M for instance runs about -6 seconds per day after a relatively recent service. I'd say whatever the stated tolerances are for the movement should be more than good enough in the long term. For cheaper movements like my Seiko 5 I'd be happy if it runs within +/- 30 seconds per day, maybe even +/- 45 seconds per day but oddly enough that watch somehow manages to achieve quartz levels of accuracy... madness.

Speaking of quartz, I have only one watch that would fall within the +/- 5 seconds per month category, the other two are closer to +10 seconds per month. I used to own a Breitling quartz which was something like -2 seconds over 18 months, but those thermo-compensated HAQ movements are of course something else entirely. I hear from time to time that many HAQ fail to match their specifications in real life so I must have been lucky, they are still very accurate of course.

Like @SurferJohn i change my watches everyday, sometimes twice a day to enjoy them all. Never paid attention to the accuracy. I am pretty sure they are accurate for the activities I do like guessing what time I should leave work and what time I should eat. Kidding aside, it depends on how important is it for you?聽
I have one #casio atomic watch that adjusts every night which I think is most accurate watch I have after #applewatch 聽which is my most expensive alarm clock.

I always find myself checking time on my phone by default. I know sounds crazy.

That is a nice looking #timex

I value accuracy in a watch, not because I need to know time to the precise second, but because to me it is a sign of a product that is good at what it's main purpose is meant to be. 聽

All of the mechanical watches that I wear in regular rotation keep time within 6 seconds per day, and most are within 1-2 SPD. I only have one quartz watch that is part of my normal rotation, an Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker which has gained 1 second in the 131 days since I purchased it, which works out to about 3 seconds per year.聽

For me, +-15 seconds per day is OK. It is OK to adjust my watch once in every 2-3 days, but not everyday.

However, not every watch could manage that so .. that is why my wife seeing me stuck in front of watch box everyday 馃槄馃槄

I don鈥檛 pay attention to accuracy more than down to the minute so if it鈥檚 within that I鈥檓 fine with it. But if I relied on being on time for things to the second everyday like for work or something like that I鈥檇 be more strict but for me it鈥檚 not that big of a deal.聽

Accuracy only matters to me as it relates to my activity. I do use my wrist watch to check the time, and 99.9% of the time +/-60sec of accuracy works. That said I do expect a watch to perform within spec, for the warranty period. After that its less about accuracy and more about if I love the watch or not.

Thanks for all the replies. I'll relax and enjoy the Timex since it is well within the -20 to +40 spec of an A-grade Seagull ST6.聽

I鈥檓 an time accuracy junky, and I have zero tolerance, which is why I have GPS/BT/RF controlled time syncing daily on my quartz movements. For mechanicals, I regulate them myself to be ~3s/day and at that, it makes me nvtz but it鈥檚 the best I can do for the 300 year old technology. I鈥檓 looking to buy some high end HAQ, and still waiting for my QT-8000B tester to get here, so I can super tune them to be +/- 5s/yr, and I鈥檒l have to live with that. BTW, I got a Seagull ST1655 and ST1901 that both keep +/- 3s/day that I timegrapher tuned, I鈥檓 impressed, the keyless works is a tad janky but I can fix that聽

Tolerance as documented by manufacturer, plus I don't want to ever risk 15 second loss in a day if it's a watch I don't trust, or 15 seconds per week if it's a watch I do trust. Basically, I want them all to regulate themselves, and if they don't, I sonically vibrate them with negative syllables until the electro-mechanism vaporizes. For example, my 1990s Eco Drive E76 is not a particularly accurate watch at +- 30s/mo (my estimate) which is probably more meaningful to normal people than the manual's hedging +-15 on average with typical use. Not technically wrong but word of mouth / social media marketing seems, uh, more generous.聽

It may sound a little bit pretentious but my tolerance is < 4 seconds delta per day. Most of my watches are even within 2 spd. I regularly set my watches to the precise time at the latest when they drift more than 20-30 seconds in total.

watchesandespresso

It may sound a little bit pretentious but my tolerance is < 4 seconds delta per day. Most of my watches are even within 2 spd. I regularly set my watches to the precise time at the latest when they drift more than 20-30 seconds in total.

Ultimately, I'm usually "double-wristing" with an Apple Watch on the other wrist, so I have perfect time available. 聽I track my new purchases to see how they're doing. I have a watch I bought in April that has an NH35 in it that settled in about +5 spd on the wrist or flat, and about -3 spd stored 12-up... with "positional regulation" I haven't had to reset the time since June and it is currently 1 second off atomic (despite the movement having a date, the watch is no-date with a ghost position). Based on this experience, the well-within-spec Timex was disappointing, but I suppose that I really shouldn't expect chronometer performance from entry-level movements in sub-$100 watches (the NH35 watch was $88 and the Timex was $85).

AFChris

Ultimately, I'm usually "double-wristing" with an Apple Watch on the other wrist, so I have perfect time available. 聽I track my new purchases to see how they're doing. I have a watch I bought in April that has an NH35 in it that settled in about +5 spd on the wrist or flat, and about -3 spd stored 12-up... with "positional regulation" I haven't had to reset the time since June and it is currently 1 second off atomic (despite the movement having a date, the watch is no-date with a ghost position). Based on this experience, the well-within-spec Timex was disappointing, but I suppose that I really shouldn't expect chronometer performance from entry-level movements in sub-$100 watches (the NH35 watch was $88 and the Timex was $85).

Positional regulation is a great way to keep your watch (almost) always within a single digit drift. The thing is that my watches are either in a winder (so the position changes constantly) or on my wrist - even at night. 馃ゲ

Anything that doesn't require adjusting more than once again or twice a week. I hate breaking watches in, and not being able to trust the time. I'll usually set them 30 or 40 seconds fast until I know their motions and personality.聽

+/- 10sec per day mechanicals although published specs are more generous.聽