How do you do a watch cull?

I have about 30, affordable, watches. They include various Casios (including G-shocks), some Seiko 5s, 3 Vostoks, microbrands including Hoffman, Elliot Brown and so on, some Steeldives, a Philippe Constant (quartz), the Seagull 1963, a Iron Annie Bauhaus, A Citizen titanium, solar, 'Ray Mears', some Swatches, a Luch one-hander and so on.聽

I like almost all of these watches but I would like the collection reduced to a box of six...or 12. None of them appears to be saleable and I plan to give the ones that are being rejected to a charity shop.聽

Does anyone know of a tried and tested way of reducing a collection? My underlying fear is that empty watch slots in a watch box will be aching to be filled. As Oscar Wilde said, 'I can resist anything except temptation.'

I have thought about putting a box of 12, less worn ones, in a cupboard and out of sight, to see if I miss them. Does this work? Or do you find you have to creep out of bed in the middle of the night to see that they are ok?

Or...given that the collection isn't saleable, should I just hold on to the lot? 馃檮

I would add that I have plenty of Diazepam and 聽a psychotherapist lined up.

It can be tough to sell lower priced watches on the secondary market. Sometimes,when you consider shipping, fees, and time spent packing for shipment you don't get enough back to cover the gas to the PO and back.

Try "bundling", like sell the Vostoks, Casios, together as a package etc.

If you have 3 or 4 G shocks sell them as a "Box of Shocks"

I think the idea of putting them away for a little while, to see if you actually notice them missing, is a good start.聽

If you find you don't miss the watches, sell or give them away. My view with watches is that money spent on them is like money spent on beer, concert tickets, etc., once it's spent its gone for good. That way, if/when I sell, I'm not worried about resale, or breaking even, it's just about making space.聽

Interesting, interesting. Tell me, which charity shop are you planning to donate them to?

On a serious note though I think if you were to sell them go with @foghorns suggestion聽

Much of what you listed is certainly saleable on the right forum. 聽A watch forum rather than Craigslist I think would be a better market because some of those are unknown to the general public but well known in the community.聽

The Seagull has value. 聽The Luch has value. 聽If it鈥檚 the Iron Annie I鈥檓 thinking of, that鈥檚 cool. 聽G-Shocks and Vostoks have their own fan base. 聽As long as you can reach the right group of buyers, you could do OK.

Never really tested to downsize. I traded one in for a new watch (not much of a downsizing) and have given some to family. If you are uncertain I believe @KristianG gave a good advice. It鈥檚 applicable for more things than watches.

I actually tried to give a few to my kids. ("Dad, I have my Fitbit!")

I forget now who pointed this out, but watch boxes are real bad. 聽The empty slots goad us into filling them. 聽And if you get more, you're tempted to get another watch box. 聽But, then, there are empty slots all over again. 聽Etc., etc.

The forum member had a simple pad on his desk, upon which he placed his watches. 聽Brilliant!

Here's what I bought to emulate his setup:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08WK65N8S/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

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What鈥檚 a watch cull? 馃槈

For lower priced watches, I do not worry about selling them. The effort isn鈥檛 worth the reward for me. So I give them away, or donate them. Watches are a hobby, and hobbies have expenses. I rationalize by not thinking of it as an asset and more as an experience. If I play golf (I don鈥檛), I would not expect to get back my green fees if I quit. I did it for the fun I had at that time. If I go to a concert, I don鈥檛 expect to get that money back. It鈥檚 for the experience. And for the affordable watches, I had the experience of owning them for a period of time, and now it鈥檚 time to let someone else enjoy it.This limits my selling to expensive pieces, and I鈥檓 much more thoughtful about those purchases than I am about an impulsive affordable purchase so I鈥檓 less likely to make a mistake. It might not be ideal, but it works for me and I am happy and content.

That鈥榮 what I do.

I was a serial aquirer and culler for a while, and still adhere to a pretty severe 1 in, 1 out policy. 聽I've found that even pretty cheap stuff will sell on Watchuseek or eBay, if it's something that people want. 聽As said above, I doubt you'd have trouble moving the Vostoks, GShocks, or Ray Mears.

I'm left wondering why? 聽Why get rid of any of them if you still like them? 聽Especially if you're not giving them to anyone you know or getting money for them. 聽Just put your "favorite" 12 in a box and store the rest in a closet. 聽As time goes on you may find that you like to rotate them, or maybe not. 聽You can always get rid of them later if you find you don't like them anymore.

MissingMilo

For lower priced watches, I do not worry about selling them. The effort isn鈥檛 worth the reward for me. So I give them away, or donate them. Watches are a hobby, and hobbies have expenses. I rationalize by not thinking of it as an asset and more as an experience. If I play golf (I don鈥檛), I would not expect to get back my green fees if I quit. I did it for the fun I had at that time. If I go to a concert, I don鈥檛 expect to get that money back. It鈥檚 for the experience. And for the affordable watches, I had the experience of owning them for a period of time, and now it鈥檚 time to let someone else enjoy it.This limits my selling to expensive pieces, and I鈥檓 much more thoughtful about those purchases than I am about an impulsive affordable purchase so I鈥檓 less likely to make a mistake. It might not be ideal, but it works for me and I am happy and content.

That鈥榮 what I do.

Eff'ing brilliant!!! 聽Exactly right!!!

Find some folk that want to trade watches and try that....

Thanks for this, guys. It is all helpful info. I am not worried about getting my money back. As a couple of people have suggested, I bought them, enjoyed them and don't expect anything back. The other side of this, of course, is that - given that I didn't pay huge amounts for them - I could just hang on to them.聽

I know which ones are definite keepers: the Citizen Ray Mears, the Iron Annie, Bauhaus, the Frederique Constant and at least one of the Vostoks (a red faced Kommanderski). Of the seven Casios I have, I will keep the G-shock that links to an atomic clock and is solar powered. I don't wear it very much but I use it to set my other watches. I also love my new Swatch Skin Irony with a red strap. So much that I have a blue one being delivered tomorrow.聽

I will defo keep the Elliot Brown. If you haven't seen these, you might want to look at them here; they are incredible watches. 聽https://elliotbrownwatches.com/

With the Elliot Brown on one wrist and the Ray Mearns on the other, you could be dragged through a steel mill and they would both survive. I guess you might not be there to witness it though...

My current thinking, based on the valuable advice here is that I will put 12 watches away and see if I miss them. I will still give away the ones that are surplus, rather than attempt to sell them. I have pursued various selling routes and nothing came of them. Even the local pawn shop turned them down (no, really!). To be brutally frank, I can't be bothered to sign up for on-line selling. Lazy, I know, but old age is creeping on...

I had the same problem I had 20 and reduced down to 10 and I can say although I am happy with the 10 I have I definitely regret selling 2 my Maurice Lacroix Aikon and my Seiko Presage blue cocktail, and I do want to add 聽many more, I know this probably doesn鈥檛 help but just be careful you don鈥檛 find yourself regretting some that you get rid of

Thanks, Ian. That is a very useful point. I would hate to look back and regret having given away a particular watch that I subsequently missed. I know, too, that I would be tempted to buy it again!