I found a mechanical chronograph which I like the look of - anyone have knowledge about the movement?

Hello fellow crunchers/crunchettes!

This is the new "Tissot PR516 Mechanical Chronograph", I absolutely love how it looks and it's one of the few "entry" chronographs where I would be able to wear because of the (in my opinion) reasonable thickness.

It's a watch I could slowly work my way towards getting in the next two or three years. I want to know if anyone has a clue about the reliability/serviceability of the movement (or whether in say 20 years Tissot would still be able to service/replace the movement - a hard question I know). The fact that Tissot service costs are a lot more affordable then other watchmakers is a huge factor for me too.

The movement is apparently a modified variant of the "Valjoux 7753".

Reply

Valjoux 7753 is basically a 7750 without day complication and has a pusher (at 10 o'clock) to adjust date.

This one seems to be further modified by removing the rotor and date wheel. Moreover, it seems to lack an adjustment lever, meaning when it is due for a service, sending it back to Tissot is the only option.

As far as mechanical chronographs movements go, 7750 is one of the most robust. However, like the PRX I would consider this an unserviceable movement that needs to be replaced every 10 years or so. And I think this is where the industry is headed in general, if disassembly by a watchmaker costs more than the parts, why bother?

Bilsel

Valjoux 7753 is basically a 7750 without day complication and has a pusher (at 10 o'clock) to adjust date.

This one seems to be further modified by removing the rotor and date wheel. Moreover, it seems to lack an adjustment lever, meaning when it is due for a service, sending it back to Tissot is the only option.

As far as mechanical chronographs movements go, 7750 is one of the most robust. However, like the PRX I would consider this an unserviceable movement that needs to be replaced every 10 years or so. And I think this is where the industry is headed in general, if disassembly by a watchmaker costs more than the parts, why bother?

Sad to hear, thanks for the info. Much appreciated

Bilsel

Valjoux 7753 is basically a 7750 without day complication and has a pusher (at 10 o'clock) to adjust date.

This one seems to be further modified by removing the rotor and date wheel. Moreover, it seems to lack an adjustment lever, meaning when it is due for a service, sending it back to Tissot is the only option.

As far as mechanical chronographs movements go, 7750 is one of the most robust. However, like the PRX I would consider this an unserviceable movement that needs to be replaced every 10 years or so. And I think this is where the industry is headed in general, if disassembly by a watchmaker costs more than the parts, why bother?

I also guess that because watchmakers are hard to find that the industry has had to resort to replacement instead of repair?

A 7753 is a variation of the ETA/Valjoux 7750.

They are in use since the 80s, but are based on even older designs. A stock 7753 can be serviced by any watchmaker worth leaving your watch with.

However.. Tissot made several modifications to up the power reserve and make it handwound., I can't tell you how much that impacts serviceability.

It's a good looking watch for sure.

DancingWatch

I also guess that because watchmakers are hard to find that the industry has had to resort to replacement instead of repair?

Yes, and I believe this is more of an issue for brands like Tissot than the high-end ones.

Bilsel

Valjoux 7753 is basically a 7750 without day complication and has a pusher (at 10 o'clock) to adjust date.

This one seems to be further modified by removing the rotor and date wheel. Moreover, it seems to lack an adjustment lever, meaning when it is due for a service, sending it back to Tissot is the only option.

As far as mechanical chronographs movements go, 7750 is one of the most robust. However, like the PRX I would consider this an unserviceable movement that needs to be replaced every 10 years or so. And I think this is where the industry is headed in general, if disassembly by a watchmaker costs more than the parts, why bother?

Exactly this. So many mid-tier watches will end up in drawers not running because of service costs while cheaper watches can just swap out a NH movement for $50 and keep going.

you could look for watches with the NE88, better than the 7750 and serviceable!

Bilsel

Valjoux 7753 is basically a 7750 without day complication and has a pusher (at 10 o'clock) to adjust date.

This one seems to be further modified by removing the rotor and date wheel. Moreover, it seems to lack an adjustment lever, meaning when it is due for a service, sending it back to Tissot is the only option.

As far as mechanical chronographs movements go, 7750 is one of the most robust. However, like the PRX I would consider this an unserviceable movement that needs to be replaced every 10 years or so. And I think this is where the industry is headed in general, if disassembly by a watchmaker costs more than the parts, why bother?

I've also found Tissot/ETA movements delicate and fiddley to work on. Some also contain plastic parts including the escape wheel and pallet fork.

DancingWatch

I also guess that because watchmakers are hard to find that the industry has had to resort to replacement instead of repair?

Labour in 1st world countries is expensive and so is the rent and power. Movements are cheaper to replace than service now so its just a sign of the times.

Suggest you consider a Tissot Quartz as your dollar will go a lot further.

FYI; I have a Tissot quartz Visiodate and it is a terrific watch (absolutely beautiful).

While, a more expensive Tissot Powermatic 80 required warranty service.

With quartz you are saving money, by not paying for the movement, while getting the watch case and design you want. On higher end watches the movement is part of a whole package.

Same thing with PRX - consider quartz.