"Manufacture", "homage", "Uhrwerk", "茅bauche": common words used to dress up basic things

Every time I hear certain French and German watch-related words uttered in English as if they have some special mystic significance I cringe. Especially by YouTubers.

When they're just common or garden words for "old-fashioned factory", "tribute", "movement" and "outline".

Any other polyglot folks afflicted by this?

Reply

Yes.

And if by polyglot you mean capable of saying dirty words, your mom, stop, go away, and where is the bathroom in Pashtu, Farsi, French, Spanish, Massai, and Arabic, then sure.....馃憖馃馃徎馃槀馃槅馃槣

But seeing as I had to Google exactly what 茅bauche meant, and I have zero chance of saying it right, I don't think my vote counts if we're being honest.

They bother me far less that the constant use of "horology". You like watches, you aren't a scientist...

It's like collecting old aneroid barometers, or thermometers, and claiming it's meteorology.

KristianG

They bother me far less that the constant use of "horology". You like watches, you aren't a scientist...

It's like collecting old aneroid barometers, or thermometers, and claiming it's meteorology.

Yes. Possibly even worse. It's so pretentious.

Horology you say? NIST or NPL?

solidyetti

Yes.

And if by polyglot you mean capable of saying dirty words, your mom, stop, go away, and where is the bathroom in Pashtu, Farsi, French, Spanish, Massai, and Arabic, then sure.....馃憖馃馃徎馃槀馃槅馃槣

But seeing as I had to Google exactly what 茅bauche meant, and I have zero chance of saying it right, I don't think my vote counts if we're being honest.

The thing about "茅bauche" is that when I first heard it I thought "rough sketch" as I'd only ever come across it in an art/painting context.

I wouldn't be harsh on "manufacture", since it is a single word with a precise meaning: A factory where majority of the work is done manually by the workers. It's also an English word. I just suspect it's overused. Big brands don't manufacture. Only some high-end low-volume watchmakers do.

"Tribute" is a good word and would stop being "homage" skunked into a "copied design". Too late now, I'm afraid.

No opinion on the rest.

CheapHangover

I wouldn't be harsh on "manufacture", since it is a single word with a precise meaning: A factory where majority of the work is done manually by the workers. It's also an English word. I just suspect it's overused. Big brands don't manufacture. Only some high-end low-volume watchmakers do.

"Tribute" is a good word and would stop being "homage" skunked into a "copied design". Too late now, I'm afraid.

No opinion on the rest.

To me "manufacture" sounds like a proto-factory that existed under the ancienne r茅gime in the 18th century. And/or something that makes fine porcelain and retains "manufacture" for marketing purposes. Like the various German Porzellanmanufakture which also desperately cling onto their aristocratic origins.

Let me, as a monolinguist, defend "ebauche." This is the term that has been used by the industry for more than a century to describe unfinished movements. They were unfinished for tax, tariff, and trade reasons, but the word describes exactly what they are. Why use two words when one precise one will do?

I use the word "manufacturer" for precision as well. My watch maker is a paunchy middle-aged man with a loupe, so the English "maker" won't work. The great thing about English is its ability to borrow words. A watch manufacturer may also be a brand, company, producer, or concern.

nichtvondiesemjahrhundert

To me "manufacture" sounds like a proto-factory that existed under the ancienne r茅gime in the 18th century. And/or something that makes fine porcelain and retains "manufacture" for marketing purposes. Like the various German Porzellanmanufakture which also desperately cling onto their aristocratic origins.

Your intuitive understanding is not far off: it's simply "manus" (hand) + "factor" (maker). In other words, "before mechanisation". It was a more efficinet and faster mode of producing stuff than a solo artisan doing it.

The meaning shifted now and the simple act of producing something in a factory is now "manufacturing". CAM means "computer aided manufacturing", i. e. writing a set of instructions for a machine to do your bidding, or even better, dumping a virtual 3D model into a CAM program and letting it program all the steps by itself, with just minimal input from the production engineer.

Ebauche is triggering?

We鈥檒l be upset at calling them watches next.

Porthole

Ebauche is triggering?

We鈥檒l be upset at calling them watches next.

What is this "triggered"? I am mildly tickled by anglophone pretension but haven't come across this.