No shade but seriously, what’s the appeal? Updated 🌈

Don’t get me wrong, Ben seems like a nice fellow and I like his reviews just fine but:

The guy has pretty much based his channel on calling out companies that sell super crappy drop shipped worthless watches for crazy profits to unsuspecting Watch buyers and then:

The guy starts selling what look and seem a lot like super crappy drop shipped copycat watches directly to his fans.

Am I missing something or is it a big joke or do some people have a need to belong so they buy one?

What is the appeal?

So it would seem the reason people are buying his super crappy drop shipped junk watches is to help him make a living, which I think is awesome but he attacks other people who sell super crappy drop shipped junk watches to make a living.

I guess I get it now?

Reply
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The appeal is, it's an open and obvious joke. It's a way to support his channel and be part of the joke.

Nobody buying a Spaghetti Scametti is buying it to have an amazing watch without the middle man, they are buying it to have a laugh.

I spend more on drinks during an evening out than I did on the watch, so the cost was no hardship for the entertainment provided.

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It’s all basically an inside joke, a parody. He made a series of videos “launching” the Spaghetti Scametti brand, you can search for them in YouTube.

These watches are essentially his merch, in the same way as other YouTubers sell overpriced hoodies or mugs with their logo slapped on it. I find Ben’s strategy more original than that. I didn’t buy the watch, but sure a few crunchers have one.

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It’s ironic value. An inside joke. I get it but likely won’t buy one.

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It's just like an AP but a little cheaper because they've cut out the middle man.

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TekindusT

It’s all basically an inside joke, a parody. He made a series of videos “launching” the Spaghetti Scametti brand, you can search for them in YouTube.

These watches are essentially his merch, in the same way as other YouTubers sell overpriced hoodies or mugs with their logo slapped on it. I find Ben’s strategy more original than that. I didn’t buy the watch, but sure a few crunchers have one.

Top Answer, thank you 🌈

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KristianG

The appeal is, it's an open and obvious joke. It's a way to support his channel and be part of the joke.

Nobody buying a Spaghetti Scametti is buying it to have an amazing watch without the middle man, they are buying it to have a laugh.

I spend more on drinks during an evening out than I did on the watch, so the cost was no hardship for the entertainment provided.

That’s interesting, thank you for this reply. 🌈

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Poking at bears, and helping to fund his channel.

The only serious thing is he makes no bones about what the watch is made of, and doesn't actually believe any of the ironic "heritage" and "authentic" stuff that's on the site.

I'll get one eventually. Maybe even a certified pre-owned from eBay.. 😂.

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I think saying Ben “pretty much based his channel” on calling out crap dropshipped watches is an overstatement. Yes, he has produced a number of videos on that subject, but if I was going to say his channel was based on something, it would be inexpensive quartz watches by Casio, Timex, and the like.

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BrynnThomas

I think saying Ben “pretty much based his channel” on calling out crap dropshipped watches is an overstatement. Yes, he has produced a number of videos on that subject, but if I was going to say his channel was based on something, it would be inexpensive quartz watches by Casio, Timex, and the like.

That is a fair critique.

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In the 90s there was a comedian who’s mom owned the most popular stand up club in LA. He was able to leverage his connection into a career that included hosting MTV. At one point he made a music video, because he was on MTV and a popular figure, it went to #1 despite being total garbage. MTV allowed it to go on for a day as more or less a joke. This joke has long since run its course, and is now just straight up part of the issue it was mocking.