Camera Phone

I’ve always enjoyed photography and watch photography is a combination of two of my favourite hobbies.

I’ve experimented with macro photography - along with different bodies/lenses etc and with also with lighting setups etc but for my purest workflow (point/shoot/edit/upload in 5 mins) - nothing really beats my camera phone. Obviously there is still a need for actual cameras (SLR/DSLRs/mirrorless) - different tools for different jobs, after all, but If I’m honest, around 90% of all photos I take now, are on  a camera phone - it’s just so much easier and convenient for me.

On wrist today: Christopher Ward Sealander GMT

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I definitely love my dSLR, but the image quality coming out of the new(est) phones these days is pretty stunning. Especially as part of something you carry on you all the time.

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oakenlander

I definitely love my dSLR, but the image quality coming out of the new(est) phones these days is pretty stunning. Especially as part of something you carry on you all the time.

@oakenlander Agreed. Obviously it all depends on the type of photography you do but for me, personally, the combination of ‘quality’, mobility, internet connection and editing suite makes it pretty hard to beat

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I usually shoot with my cam on weekends as that’s the only occasion I can have more time fiddling with post process. Often time as well I hit creative blocks and that puts me on a situation that I would just get a wristshot using my phone 😃 

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lifeof_a_wis

I usually shoot with my cam on weekends as that’s the only occasion I can have more time fiddling with post process. Often time as well I hit creative blocks and that puts me on a situation that I would just get a wristshot using my phone 😃 

@lifeof_a_wis I know what you mean. It can be a blessing, having to slow down and think about it a little more. Creative blocks are all part of any artistic endeavour, unfortunately! Personally, I’ve tried to get round that by approaching it as a scientific/engineering problem solving exercise. I’ve considered that any artistic value gained from the image, as a bonus, to solving the problem

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I guess it depends what you're looking to get out of it as well. There is no doubt modern smartphone cameras are pretty impressive these days, but as interested in the journey as much as the destination so to speak. Half of the fun it's having something to take my mind off other things, thinking about composition, lighting, camera settings etc is almost a form of mindfulness. 

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Chunghauphoto

@lifeof_a_wis I know what you mean. It can be a blessing, having to slow down and think about it a little more. Creative blocks are all part of any artistic endeavour, unfortunately! Personally, I’ve tried to get round that by approaching it as a scientific/engineering problem solving exercise. I’ve considered that any artistic value gained from the image, as a bonus, to solving the problem

Very well said man! It’s going to be part of the artistic cycle. Sometimes being on that “block” urges you more to pressure your mind and squeeze out those juices. 😊 

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lifeof_a_wis

Very well said man! It’s going to be part of the artistic cycle. Sometimes being on that “block” urges you more to pressure your mind and squeeze out those juices. 😊 

Yes - all part of the mindset - can you let frustration get the better of you or does it make you more determined to find a solution. It is tough sometimes…

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Just_a_watch_fan

I guess it depends what you're looking to get out of it as well. There is no doubt modern smartphone cameras are pretty impressive these days, but as interested in the journey as much as the destination so to speak. Half of the fun it's having something to take my mind off other things, thinking about composition, lighting, camera settings etc is almost a form of mindfulness. 

Oh yes - the little box that we know as a ‘camera’ (be it in a DSLR or mobile phone etc) is such a little part of actual photography. There are so many other elements as you’ve mentioned, that make it infinitely exciting/interesting. There’s a lot of attention devoted to the ‘camera gear’ part - how many megapixels? What’s the best lenses? How many autofocus points? What’s the burst rate? It makes very little difference to actual photography. For example, when people look at the Statue of David, they don’t wonder what chisel Michaelangelo used or the what type handle was on the chisel!

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I find the camera phone pics imbue watches with enhanced quality and flawlessness but they do not capture the real look of the watches.  They also look flat and overly processed to me.  People love the phone pics because they make watches look better quality than they really are, more like in a catalogue or on a website. I prefer the depth, subtley and realism of a DSLR. 

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I have a iPhone 13 Pro Max. Is a great camera setup and just so convenient. Rarely pull out our Canon DSLR anymore. 

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I used to take photos with my phone all the time and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it - the best camera is the one you have on you and the one that keeps you snapping imo. And I completely agree that the efficiency and workflow by sticking with a phone can not be beat.

For me personally, my interest in photography was simply being limited by the camera phone - and I realize I was making concessions with my shots out of the sake of convenience. I also found my mindset when shooting was noticeably different (again, this is personal to me) in that I was just being less thoughtful. Having to grab my camera made me stop and be a more conscious shooter, even if it took me an extra 5-7 minutes to transfer. That’s said I still believe in my original sentiments, whatever keeps you shooting is the important part! I’ll have to check out your IG!

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There's definitely a place for smart phones when it comes to getting quick shots. But my problem is 2 fold:

  • overprocessing of images, too much sharpening, contrast, lifting of shadows makes the picture look artificial.
  • Compression of a long lens is impossible to mimic. A digital zoom is not the same as using a longer focal length and with phone cameras, you are usually stuck at 24-50mm.  So it's hard to get strong subject separation.

Obviously the list goes on...

That said, I do plenty of shooting on my pixel and if I turn the exposure down a bit and give it some soft light, the images are highly tolerable 👍

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jason_recliner

I find the camera phone pics imbue watches with enhanced quality and flawlessness but they do not capture the real look of the watches.  They also look flat and overly processed to me.  People love the phone pics because they make watches look better quality than they really are, more like in a catalogue or on a website. I prefer the depth, subtley and realism of a DSLR. 

I think the days when a camera only shot JPEG meant you were handing a lot of the editing/post processing over to the camera maker.With newer cameras/phones shooting in RAW means photographers have to process a lot more (the image is inherently ‘flat’. Perhaps the over process comes with people’s either ‘taste’ or developing editing skills

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bevelwerks

I used to take photos with my phone all the time and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it - the best camera is the one you have on you and the one that keeps you snapping imo. And I completely agree that the efficiency and workflow by sticking with a phone can not be beat.

For me personally, my interest in photography was simply being limited by the camera phone - and I realize I was making concessions with my shots out of the sake of convenience. I also found my mindset when shooting was noticeably different (again, this is personal to me) in that I was just being less thoughtful. Having to grab my camera made me stop and be a more conscious shooter, even if it took me an extra 5-7 minutes to transfer. That’s said I still believe in my original sentiments, whatever keeps you shooting is the important part! I’ll have to check out your IG!

@bevelwerks totally agree with the ’best camera is the one you have with you’ and the importance to ‘keep shooting’ - by that I mean shooting AND reviewing why certain work or dont work or why you like/dislike them. What are the concessions to which you refer?

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Max

There's definitely a place for smart phones when it comes to getting quick shots. But my problem is 2 fold:

  • overprocessing of images, too much sharpening, contrast, lifting of shadows makes the picture look artificial.
  • Compression of a long lens is impossible to mimic. A digital zoom is not the same as using a longer focal length and with phone cameras, you are usually stuck at 24-50mm.  So it's hard to get strong subject separation.

Obviously the list goes on...

That said, I do plenty of shooting on my pixel and if I turn the exposure down a bit and give it some soft light, the images are highly tolerable 👍

@Max The overprocessing is a quite a common ‘complaint’ in the digital photography realm. I dont know if it’s a ’taste’ thing or a ‘learning curve’ thing. In decades time, we may look back on the photos from this period and see there was a trend or HDR ‘look’ which defined this era.

I agree with the digital zoom. Its handing over a lot of control to the camera and the soft/hardware. Its true that things like depth of field/separation cant be adequately reproduced by camera phones in terms of actual physics but the technology is definitely improving with each iteration of phone release