Victorian World-Time Clock

Not a watch, I know, but I thought a fair few fellow Watch Crunchers might be as interested as I was by this.

I visited the National Museum of Welsh Life at St Fagans today, much of which is made up of historic buildings from around Wales, painstakingly deconstructed and then reconstructed in the museum to avoid demolition. One such building is the Oakdale Workmen's Institute, in whose Reading Room hangs this world-time clock from 1857. The hour is indicated with a printed arrow, beneath which a disc rotates once every 24 hours; major cities and key colonies are indicated at appropriate intervals around the outside edge so that they align with their time zone on the disc. The minute, meanwhile, is indicated with a hand in the usual way.

I'm afraid that's all I know about it, but I hope some of you enjoy it as much as I did!

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Nice woodwork, and what I assume is a mirror for reflecting light behind the pendulum.

First thing I notice is calling out the US capital city of Washington instead of New York City for the Eastern time zone. I wish I could figure out that the round hole between the maps shows, or is that just to spin the disc by hand like a rotary phone?

Time zones were of course a by product of rail travel, so this was fairly early.

PoorMansRolex

Nice woodwork, and what I assume is a mirror for reflecting light behind the pendulum.

First thing I notice is calling out the US capital city of Washington instead of New York City for the Eastern time zone. I wish I could figure out that the round hole between the maps shows, or is that just to spin the disc by hand like a rotary phone?

Time zones were of course a by product of rail travel, so this was fairly early.

I think the circle between the maps might be for the key to wind it (cover on a spring to keep it closed, I鈥檓 not 100% on it however my brother has a couple of hundred clocks and I think a few might have key covers

Markell

I think the circle between the maps might be for the key to wind it (cover on a spring to keep it closed, I鈥檓 not 100% on it however my brother has a couple of hundred clocks and I think a few might have key covers

This would be my guess, but I'm afraid I didn't feel like watching it for 23 hours to make sure 馃槈

Markell

I think the circle between the maps might be for the key to wind it (cover on a spring to keep it closed, I鈥檓 not 100% on it however my brother has a couple of hundred clocks and I think a few might have key covers

The busy dial caused me to not count or even notice winding arbors. Makes sense, and this would not need a separate one for any bells. Wind at noon, presumably weekly.

you can see the influence of this on 1800s marine chronometers, all the way up to the present time:

https://www.stowa.de/marine-classic-40-roman-automatic-basic-without-date-leather-strap-black-hand-stitched_1

Thanks for taking the time to share that with us during your travels.

PoorMansRolex

The busy dial caused me to not count or even notice winding arbors. Makes sense, and this would not need a separate one for any bells. Wind at noon, presumably weekly.

That鈥檚 what I was thinking. The dial is highly detailed, it would have been expensive as well so a bit of extra effort gone into it I think

Cool clock, thank you for sharing.