Hamilton H-Series Automatic Movement, Departure From ETA Good or Bad?

I am a big fan of Hamilton. I consider myself pretty green when it comes to the latest changes and departure with Hamilton and ETA. Speaking directly to the departure of metals to composite movements. Is Hamiltons “H“ series automatic movements inferior to that of ETA and why? Are there groups that sell the older Hamilton with ETA recently serviced pre-owned for sale? Are watch groups such as; Tissot, Certina, and Mido better options than Hamilton? of these ETA watch companies aforementioned above service cost affordable to that of Hamilton? I greatly appreciate further Knowledge from the community? 

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My understanding is that the Hamilton "H" movements are modified ETA 2824s.  The idea was to slow the beat rate so that they could increase the power reserve to 80 hours.  This sounds like a very favorable trade off to me, and I would consider the H movement an improvement over the original ETA.

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Thank you. I was speaking more to the quality of it‘s movement. There has been mentioned that H series has smaller movements that are composite Instead of metals. That this was the departure I failed to bring attention to. If this is the case, what areas of the watch are composite or hardened plastics? Does this include the day, date function??😳

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Hamilton is part of the Swatch Group, which owns ETA.  A Swiss court order determining that ETA was effectively a monopoly means that ETA now exclusively provides its movements to Swatch Group brands.  Other brands these days use clone movements from the likes of Sellita and STP or alternatives, such as the La Joux Perret movements or Ronda R150.  Recently, ETA, to differentiate its movements has removed the famed ETA-chron regulator from its movements and started laser regulating them at the factory.  They've also slowed the beat rate from 28800 to 21600 or 25200 vph depending on the brand to extend power reserves. The re-jiggered movements have been given new names depending on the brand to make them seem more in-house.  But the reality is that they'r all still ETA movements.  On the lower end, they've started to introduce more plastic parts as a way to cut costs.

Personally I prefer the older movements, both for the higher beat rate and the ease of regulation over time, as even a laser regulated piece will eventually drift.

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Bridger

Thank you. I was speaking more to the quality of it‘s movement. There has been mentioned that H series has smaller movements that are composite Instead of metals. That this was the departure I failed to bring attention to. If this is the case, what areas of the watch are composite or hardened plastics? Does this include the day, date function??😳

I don’t think they are making composites, I think the only changes are the beat rate. It would be inferior in that the second sweep is not as smooth. 

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My Hamilton Khaki Field Auto had the 2824 in it. I messed it up pretty badly on the farm. I sent it in for repair to the swatch group, as the cost was quoted less than the local watchmaker. 

It returned with a new movement,  one of the new H series movements. I barely notice the slowed beat rate, unless I'm looking specifically for that. 

The biggest change for me is that the regulator is going to be harder for a watchmaker that is not part of the swatch group to regulate, as the adjustment screw has been removed from its normal location.

I don't have access to easy to post pics of it, but a quick google search should show you the changed regulator setup. 

I'm not saying it's worse, but it is frustrating anytime user serviceability suffers

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"Departure from ETA?" Hamilton is a Swatch Group brand and thus uses ETA only. The H-series nomenclature is pure marketing, except movements made by ETA for Hamilton only. Some calibres by ETA are shared between SG brands without brand-exclusive modifications, some are exclusive to only one brand of the holding. 

H-10 time-only auto - ETA C07.611 (Powermatic 80, 25 jewels + Nivachron hairspring), found also in Tissot, Certina, Rado and Mido). For what it's worth, the Powermatic 80 comes in three basic configurations: C07.211 (23 jewels, synthetic escapement with no pallet jewels, Nivachron), C07.611 (25 jewels, Nivachron) and C07.811 (25 jewels, Silicium hairspring).

H-51-Si - by ETA for Hamilton only, a hand-wound conversion of the A05 generation of the ETA/Valjoux 775X architecture, with Silicium hairspring.

H-50 - another Hammy-exclusive by ETA, basically a 2804 hand-cranker with Powermatic 80 modifications.

H-21/H-31 - next-gen (A05) ETA-Valjoux, 7750/7753 bases. Much like Powermatic 80, they were redesigned thoroughly to soup up the power reserve.

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MrBloke

"Departure from ETA?" Hamilton is a Swatch Group brand and thus uses ETA only. The H-series nomenclature is pure marketing, except movements made by ETA for Hamilton only. Some calibres by ETA are shared between SG brands without brand-exclusive modifications, some are exclusive to only one brand of the holding. 

H-10 time-only auto - ETA C07.611 (Powermatic 80, 25 jewels + Nivachron hairspring), found also in Tissot, Certina, Rado and Mido). For what it's worth, the Powermatic 80 comes in three basic configurations: C07.211 (23 jewels, synthetic escapement with no pallet jewels, Nivachron), C07.611 (25 jewels, Nivachron) and C07.811 (25 jewels, Silicium hairspring).

H-51-Si - by ETA for Hamilton only, a hand-wound conversion of the A05 generation of the ETA/Valjoux 775X architecture, with Silicium hairspring.

H-50 - another Hammy-exclusive by ETA, basically a 2804 hand-cranker with Powermatic 80 modifications.

H-21/H-31 - next-gen (A05) ETA-Valjoux, 7750/7753 bases. Much like Powermatic 80, they were redesigned thoroughly to soup up the power reserve.

This^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

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I love Certina for value, toughness, style, heritage. Big fan

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cornfedksboy

I don’t think they are making composites, I think the only changes are the beat rate. It would be inferior in that the second sweep is not as smooth. 

Depends on which C07 movement you get (the new ETA 2824-2) 

C07.111 is the no frills, lowest cost movement, these use a synthetic escapement. There's the C07.611, that uses regular escapement and the C07.811, the Silicium, that uses a silicon hairspring. 

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Which movement is regulated to 25,200?