What Makes a Keeper?

Hi all--

Forgive me if this has been a thread before.  I am curious on the criteria collectors use to determine a keeper in their collection.  A classic? A valuable or rare piece? A watch with heritage? Or something with memories and sentimental value hooked to it?  I have flipped (sadly) hundreds of watches over the years.  

Three watches never leave-- My great grandfather/grandfather's Waltham pocket watch (re-cased in a Vortex case), a 1990s Seiko Tidal watch (the first watch I bought myself, and the Omega pictured above...  

The Omega was given to me by my wife when I became a full tenured professor and we really couldn't afford it.  It has been with me over so many big life events and true adventures that I now have semi-retired it. This relatively beat up, common, and fairly inexpensive piece is near priceless to me and is a bit of a safe queen.  

How do you all determine a keeper?

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For me,a keeper is a watch that makes me happy to put on every time. I have no buyers remorse or desire to sell it. I've sold many watches that went up in value. I don't collect to make money (silly even to say IMO) All watches that are family gifts stay of course.  My Tough Solar G Shock my son gave me is my most prized watch

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A keeper huh? Anything I am excited to put on. I have bought a few watches simply to buy them over the few years I have been part or this hobby. Those watches did not last more than a year in my watch box regardless of their value or rarity. All my keepers are my watches that have some meaning or that I really like the styling of. The only watch given to me was by my brother, and I gave it to my brother in law for his wedding. It felt right and looked better on him than it ever did on me.

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I've given away several myself--often Seiko mods or vintage pieces.  I have a 7.5" wrist and my son has a 6.5" wrist.  He has most of my vintage pieces now and that got him into the hobby,

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I guess for me it's a mix of sentimental value + (perceived) monetary value. I'm more likely going to remember spending a large sum of money, and I'll more likely cherish it out of the box than a more affordable watch.

I guess sentimental value wise, it incorporates the memories associated with the watch and how well I "vibe" with the watch too. For example, as much as I enjoyed my Orient Mako II and made some fun memories with it, I wouldn't be too sad letting it go. For whatever reason I can't quite pinpoint, it always looked a bit off on me.

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For me it comes down to how much I enjoy wearing a watch.

I don't have any that were gifted, or handed down, but they would obviously be keepers if I had any. 

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For Myself it will be watches that stand the test of time, watches that I continually enjoying wearing and because I am a very pragmatic person watches that have reasons I wear them from the G-Shock(s) that I wear to work to my regular weekenders. If I dont have a use for a watch and do not wear it, it will probably eventually be replaced by something I do wear. But I only keep a maximum of 8 watches in my collection atm so if I want something new something else will leave if I am at the max.

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A keeper for me is a watch that has sentimental value, watches given to me by family and friends. Everything else will eventually get moved on.

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Agreed with most here. A keeper is something that just makes you smile no matter how long youve had it and no matter the price.

If you talk to a watch investor they may say different, but thats not the general vibe on WC.

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Like a lot of others here, sentimental value is the most important criteria. 

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Thanks for the thoughtful replies!

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You are the determining factor of whether or not to keep a watch. It’s always subjective. Lot’s of folks have lots of reasons. I’m a hoarder in that I haven’t let any of my watches go, but it’s a grand total of a bakers dozen, so not out of control. Granted I’ve only started my fascination maybe four years ago, but I enjoy my snails pace.

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If it was a gift it gets kept; everything else is passing through.

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A keeper is a loop or other holder to keep excess strap length from flapping around it can be made of metal, leather, fabric, rubber, etc. and can be made by a machine or hand or a combination of both. It’s that sideways piece near the buckle in your photo. 😉

All jest aside, I only have one watch, but I suspect that if I had a bunch come through my possession, the ones that would stick around would be the ones that I wore the most and the ones that had stories and sentimental value attached to them.

The Omega Seamaster Professional has never attracted me so much as it does now reading the story of yours while also glancing over at your bio with the boat in the icon and San Diego (former home for eight years) as the location. It seems like a perfect watch for someone in San Diego who spends a lot of time at/in/on the ocean. The color is perfect and it looks a bit faded from the California sun, doesn’t matter if that’s the case or not. Bonus: “relatively beat up, common.”

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Pretty much anything i feel like using, could be a daily watch or just for some spefic use or maybe a watch i inherited from some family member and i am now for the time being it's keeper, but it's always a watch that marks soemthing, it isn't about the money, all my watches are common watches but for example my father gave me his Seiko 5 he wasn't using anymore and i would never trade if for any watch, its worth it's beyond any money.

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My collection theme deems all watches keepers. 

That said, I did gift 2 watches recently that brought me no joy. Both came from WatchGang, meaning I didn't select them. 

But if I select it, it has a 99.99% chance of being a keeper. 

If it was gifted to me, it has a 100% chance of being a keeper. 

So I guess that's my criteria: if I selected it or if it was a gift. 

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roberto

A keeper is a loop or other holder to keep excess strap length from flapping around it can be made of metal, leather, fabric, rubber, etc. and can be made by a machine or hand or a combination of both. It’s that sideways piece near the buckle in your photo. 😉

All jest aside, I only have one watch, but I suspect that if I had a bunch come through my possession, the ones that would stick around would be the ones that I wore the most and the ones that had stories and sentimental value attached to them.

The Omega Seamaster Professional has never attracted me so much as it does now reading the story of yours while also glancing over at your bio with the boat in the icon and San Diego (former home for eight years) as the location. It seems like a perfect watch for someone in San Diego who spends a lot of time at/in/on the ocean. The color is perfect and it looks a bit faded from the California sun, doesn’t matter if that’s the case or not. Bonus: “relatively beat up, common.”

It is the perfect San Diego watch--been fishing, free diving, kayaking, snorkeling... the bezel is faded and the dial is beginning to fade...the lume is picking up some patina as well...