HSNY Watchmaking class

I would look to put in a plug for the watchmaking classes at HSNY in NYC. I鈥檓 live 4.5hrs outside the city and have a kid that lives in lower Manhattan. On a family trip last weekend I went to a Saturday class. The class covered some history, theory, and the disassembly/assembly of a ETA 6497 taught by a couple highly skilled professional watchmakers. Everyone had their own bench and tools. Really great class. I鈥檓 an engineer with a full time job so I don鈥檛 have the time to go to college for another degree. I love the weekend/evening class at a time option.

Have you ever thought of taking a class?

If you could take some classes what do you aspire to?

I鈥檇 like to rescue some watches that just need some basic service and get them back in circulation. What about you?

Reply

When I go to Switzerland, I fully plan on taking a day to attend a class.

I have taken some online classes, where we played with the same movement. This movement is very popular for classes because it is larger than your usual wrist watch movement.

Was it a Swiss 6497 or a Chinese clone (ST3600)? When you disassembled the movement, did you also take out and lubricated balance jewels? Also, did you disassemble the mainspring barrel and take out the main spring? Those two things are most difficult for me.

It was an origional eta and not a clone. Did everything except main spring

I've thought about it. HSNY is about five blocks from work. The $200+ price tag puts me off a bit, not that the price is unfair. Someday I'll find some same for it.

I鈥檝e 鈥済one to school鈥 mostly via Wrist Watch Revival and others on YouTube. I have successfully rescued a few eBay finds, though I was pretty fortunate finding some that needed little more than TLC. My first was beyond repair, but learned why and dis-/re-assembled it several times, learning tweezer skills under magnification. I liken it to med students learning anatomy on cadavers.

I鈥檓 working my way through a small lot of watches. Salvaged one already but others my be unrecoverable. I鈥檓 enjoying it for the skills and problem solving but don鈥檛 think I鈥檇 want to do it under pressures of customers and schedules.

wilfried

I've thought about it. HSNY is about five blocks from work. The $200+ price tag puts me off a bit, not that the price is unfair. Someday I'll find some same for it.

Yup I get it. It feels like a lot of money. But 6 students and some expensive instructors, it鈥檚 a good deal. Plenty of individual attention and hands on help

NotThatNeil

I鈥檝e 鈥済one to school鈥 mostly via Wrist Watch Revival and others on YouTube. I have successfully rescued a few eBay finds, though I was pretty fortunate finding some that needed little more than TLC. My first was beyond repair, but learned why and dis-/re-assembled it several times, learning tweezer skills under magnification. I liken it to med students learning anatomy on cadavers.

I鈥檓 working my way through a small lot of watches. Salvaged one already but others my be unrecoverable. I鈥檓 enjoying it for the skills and problem solving but don鈥檛 think I鈥檇 want to do it under pressures of customers and schedules.

I in the same you tube rabbit holes. Picked up some nice tips and extra insights from class I appreciate

I plan on doing this the next time they do the 鈥渢raveling class鈥 in DC

Is that your hand(s)? Cool pic

WristCounselor

I plan on doing this the next time they do the 鈥渢raveling class鈥 in DC

Is that your hand(s)? Cool pic

Stole that image off the HSNY web site

I went all the way and got my SAWTA 馃お Learned an absolutely incredible amount. Even after working on watches 8-12hrs a day for 2 years, you come out of school very much an amateur and with an infinite amount of learning still to do.