GMT bezels should be bi-directional

I don't care if it's a "dive" GMT or not. If it's got a 24-hour scale, it needs to move in both directions. It's best if it's a 24-click bi-directional bezel, so the hours will only line up correctly. Also acceptable is a friction bezel, so you can still get the hours lined up easily. Worse is some multiple of 24-clicks, but at least it will still line up. A non-multiple of 24-clicks is bad because it might not align correctly in some hour positions. The worst is a non-multiple of 24-clicks that ratchets because not only will it not line up in some hour positions, but if you need to go counterclockwise, you have to spin it all the way around and be careful not to go past where you want it, or you're going all the way around again.

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There are timezones divided on the half hour, Australia has one, so 48 clicks might not be so bad in some cases. Or just get a Vostok with their traditional friction bezel.

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My Pagani Flanders has a unidirectional GMT bezel and I am not a fan. Coming from Vostoks, I do not see the appeal for every watch with a tool bezel to be undirectional (minus GMTs).

24-click may sound ideal at first, but when you start to factor how many people live in awkward timezones from Iran to Myanmar, you quickly realize that that is sizable portion of the human population that is totally ignored by such a design. ~1.7 billion, with India being the most glaring example. So a bidirectional 120-click would probably be the most cost-effective and most base-covering option that isnโ€™t friction fit.