Vintage automatic Rotary (Need advice)

I got this watch from my Grandfather yesterday, he received from his father(who repaired watches as a hobby) many years ago. The watch seems to work but I don't want to test it to much incase that damages it. It sat in a draw for many years so I am unsure if it runs properly. 

SO my question is: Do I get this watch professionally serviced or should I just keep it as is?

I am worried that if I get it serviced it will be very expensive (I am a university student) or something goes wrong (I have never had a watch serviced before).

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Get some Polywatch. It is less than $10USD and Amazon will send it to you if you can't find it locally.  Clean the crystal. You will be surprised what an improvement that will make. If there is accumulated gunk in crevices you can take a soft toothbrush and a little sudsy water and gently scrub with a moistened toothbrush.

Wind it. Stop if it is too difficult. If you can wind it, try about ten turns and see if the second hand starts moving. If it does turn about 15 more times. (If it is an automatic 10 turns and a little shake should do.) Set it and see if it keeps time. Sometimes a gentle side to side shake with your wrist will get a watch moving (like you are turning a key quickly).

You will have to eventually service it.  However, it may have gone into the drawer because of the crystal.

Mechanical watches are not fragile.  They don't need to be babied. If it works wear it. If it loses or gains too much time set it aside until you can afford to put it right. Don't swim with it. I might not go rock climbing with it.

There are two types of watchmakers: 1) perfectionists, and 2) those who make do.  It is useful to have experience with both.  For my expensive pieces I use type 1. For cheap fun pieces I use type 2.

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Aurelian

Get some Polywatch. It is less than $10USD and Amazon will send it to you if you can't find it locally.  Clean the crystal. You will be surprised what an improvement that will make. If there is accumulated gunk in crevices you can take a soft toothbrush and a little sudsy water and gently scrub with a moistened toothbrush.

Wind it. Stop if it is too difficult. If you can wind it, try about ten turns and see if the second hand starts moving. If it does turn about 15 more times. (If it is an automatic 10 turns and a little shake should do.) Set it and see if it keeps time. Sometimes a gentle side to side shake with your wrist will get a watch moving (like you are turning a key quickly).

You will have to eventually service it.  However, it may have gone into the drawer because of the crystal.

Mechanical watches are not fragile.  They don't need to be babied. If it works wear it. If it loses or gains too much time set it aside until you can afford to put it right. Don't swim with it. I might not go rock climbing with it.

There are two types of watchmakers: 1) perfectionists, and 2) those who make do.  It is useful to have experience with both.  For my expensive pieces I use type 1. For cheap fun pieces I use type 2.

Thank you very much for the advice😁 I will look for some polywatch and I will test the watch a little.

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I forgot to add:  watches are like any machine, they are meant to be used. If you get it going, it may be more accurate in the second 24 hour period than the first. It is just as likely to become more accurate as less in the short term. In the long term it will need a thorough going over.