Oris releases 39mm ProPilot X Calibre 400 titanium

ProPilot X Calibre 400

The ProPilot X Calibre 400 follows in a long line of Oris pilot’s watches going back to the early 1900s, but its power lies beyond its associations: it’s a mechanical joy machine.

www.oris.ch
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As widely expected, Oris just released a 39mm ProPilot X Calibre 400 titanium at Watches and Wonders.

Nice looking watch in blue! All of the Calibear movement watches are a bit pricey compared to what we are used to from Oris, which I think is going to be their big challenge as they try to move up-market and control their own movement supply more.

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This is the best of the new watch announcements that I have seen today (I might have missed some, dunno). I like the way that Oris is exploring what a 2022 watch can be. Meanwhile everything else seems a bit more backward facing in some way or another.

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These are a smart compelling product offering.  As far as "go-anywhere-do-anything" watches go, I can picture folks seriously cross shopping these against Aqua Terras, Grand Seiko, and Oyster Perpetuals. 

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roberto

This is the best of the new watch announcements that I have seen today (I might have missed some, dunno). I like the way that Oris is exploring what a 2022 watch can be. Meanwhile everything else seems a bit more backward facing in some way or another.

I'd have to agree. This and the #tudor Black Bay Pro GMT have been the two standouts of the show, and the Tudor is obviously very derivative. They make the best Rolex homages on the market. The #grandseiko  Spring Drive Diver SLGA015 caught my eye, but it is a bit out of what I could picture spending on a dive watch to beat around.

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AstoriaWatchNerd

These are a smart compelling product offering.  As far as "go-anywhere-do-anything" watches go, I can picture folks seriously cross shopping these against Aqua Terras, Grand Seiko, and Oyster Perpetuals. 

They are at an interesting price point compared to all of the above at their starting price models, and across laterally at Tudor and what it is doing. I find Oris's designs a bit more diverse than Tudor and am obviously a bit biased toward the brand. The gap between a $2K watch and a $5K watch is definitely getting some more compelling options in the market. I have a feeling a lot of that is being driven by the scarcity of ETA movements making brands take more control of their supply chain and doing some innovation in the process.

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They still haven’t figure out how to fill the sports watch gap in their lineup since they retired the Artix line. Putting the Calibre 400 in a new sports watch model line would really make a splash. 

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BlueDial

They still haven’t figure out how to fill the sports watch gap in their lineup since they retired the Artix line. Putting the Calibre 400 in a new sports watch model line would really make a splash. 

I‘ve always lumped diver, pilot, and field watches as sub-types of ”sport watches.” Help me understand what you mean… What would you like to see different from this model for an ideal new Oris sports watch?

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Hodinkee’s review by Cole Pennington is out: https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/embargo-30-march-2022-830am-cet-the-oris-propilot-x-calibre-400-takes-oris-in-house-caliber-to-new-h

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Bobofet

I‘ve always lumped diver, pilot, and field watches as sub-types of ”sport watches.” Help me understand what you mean… What would you like to see different from this model for an ideal new Oris sports watch?

To me (since there is no written rule on the topic), diver, pilot and field watches are all "tool watches" - they are built to fulfill a specific need of its wearer. The dive watch has a graduated bezel that helps the owner time their dives. The pilots watch has large numerals and is typically larger in size to help pilots read the time (and distance) while in flight. The field watch was created for military applications. Yes, not all owners use these watches in the way they were intended, but their design has a specific genesis.

When I think "sports watch" I think of watches like the #rolex #oysterperpetual and the #omega #aquaterra. Yes, these have lineage in utility, but have since been replaced by tool watches that are much more specific to their intended use. These are sports watches - typically featuring stainless-steel cases and fixed, smooth bezels. They use baton indices instead of numbers because fashion is ahead of utility. They may or may not have a date, and that is where it usually begins and ends. The last sports watch in Oris' lineup was the Artix:

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They had many different variations, including tie-ins with motorsports, but above is a classic version with a deep #bluedial. I would love to see them update the Artix line and present it with a Calibre 400 movement. It definitely needs some refinement if its going to compete against the AquaTerra and OP lines, but having a proprietary movement is a great step towards that showdown. I'm definitely looking forward to it.

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Saw some macro shots on Insta - frankly, while the case looks beautiful and the movement is great, the dial... The dial is absolutely horrible. So are the hands. The hands look like sheet metal that wasn't brushed, but scraped against a pavement. The print quality of the logo and the hour markers is unbecoming of a watch for 10% of the Oris's price.

For the money, the Longines Spirit Titanium is a way smarter choice. And if someone just likes the looks of that Oris, I believe RZE offers something of the sort for something like 600 euro. 

To me, Oris is really the kind of brand that one buys when their prices are spare change to one, not the kind that you'd wanna save up for. If it is a considerable expense to one, there's scores of stuff that offers way better bang for the buck - because in terms of value for money Oris loses miserably each and every single time. The ones I've handled were just underwhelming, especially knowing that they're priced higher or equal to similar pieces from Longines, Certina, Maurice Lacroix... The cal.400 doesn't have direct competition from these, but then again, for cal.400 money, why wouldn't one go with Tudor?

If someone just loves the design of an Oris, I get it, love isn't driven by logic. 

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Bobofet

Hodinkee’s review by Cole Pennington is out: https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/embargo-30-march-2022-830am-cet-the-oris-propilot-x-calibre-400-takes-oris-in-house-caliber-to-new-h

I really wish watch press would stop calling the Calibre 400 an "in-house" movement. Just because Oris designed it, doesn't mean they manufacture it. This reminds me of Apple's "Designed in California" print. We understand that an Apple employee came up with the design of the iPhone, but no one then jumps to the conclusion that an Apple employee put it together. It's disingenuous to manufacturers who actually put their own movements together.

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TBH the only person I see wearing this over an Omega AT would be a WIS. I think the look of the AT is safer and appeases the masses more so. I don't see these two as competing. 

I would still love to see this in person. The bracelet looks really cool, and the reviews of the skeleton from a few years ago seem positive.

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BlueDial

I really wish watch press would stop calling the Calibre 400 an "in-house" movement. Just because Oris designed it, doesn't mean they manufacture it. This reminds me of Apple's "Designed in California" print. We understand that an Apple employee came up with the design of the iPhone, but no one then jumps to the conclusion that an Apple employee put it together. It's disingenuous to manufacturers who actually put their own movements together.

Semantics to me. If someone were to refer to the Apple Silicon SoC as “in-house,” I wouldn’t debate them on it.

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BlueDial

To me (since there is no written rule on the topic), diver, pilot and field watches are all "tool watches" - they are built to fulfill a specific need of its wearer. The dive watch has a graduated bezel that helps the owner time their dives. The pilots watch has large numerals and is typically larger in size to help pilots read the time (and distance) while in flight. The field watch was created for military applications. Yes, not all owners use these watches in the way they were intended, but their design has a specific genesis.

When I think "sports watch" I think of watches like the #rolex #oysterperpetual and the #omega #aquaterra. Yes, these have lineage in utility, but have since been replaced by tool watches that are much more specific to their intended use. These are sports watches - typically featuring stainless-steel cases and fixed, smooth bezels. They use baton indices instead of numbers because fashion is ahead of utility. They may or may not have a date, and that is where it usually begins and ends. The last sports watch in Oris' lineup was the Artix:

Image

They had many different variations, including tie-ins with motorsports, but above is a classic version with a deep #bluedial. I would love to see them update the Artix line and present it with a Calibre 400 movement. It definitely needs some refinement if its going to compete against the AquaTerra and OP lines, but having a proprietary movement is a great step towards that showdown. I'm definitely looking forward to it.

The ProPilot X in this post is remarkably similar to a sports watch, by that definition.

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Bobofet

The ProPilot X in this post is remarkably similar to a sports watch, by that definition.

Maybe that is why the design isn’t working for me. As the name suggests, the ProPilot series is supposed to be pilot watches. I’m not sure how changing the dial and throwing an “x” after the name makes this a sports watch. As far as I can tell, it has a fixed bezel - so why the knurling? And did they even bother to change the hands? With a little more effort, this could have been a standout piece. As it is presented, it feels out of place as both a pilot and sports watch. 

I am a fan of Oris, but to me, this is a missed opportunity.