How to measure time loss/gain

Whats the best way to measure time loss/gain? I just got a new Rolex so I want to see if its really within COSC spec

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To be honest, I just go by the feeling. If I'm adjusting the time often then I know something is up and bring it to my AD

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son_of_chrono

To be honest, I just go by the feeling. If I'm adjusting the time often then I know something is up and bring it to my AD

Yeah that’s what I usually do too but with a brand new watch I’m just that little bit more inquisitive to see if the brand is telling the truth

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I use Toolwatch, the app. I have an iPhone so I'm not sure if you’ll be able to use it if you have an android but it times the watch for you and calculates the accuracy

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zalman24

I use Toolwatch, the app. I have an iPhone so I'm not sure if you’ll be able to use it if you have an android but it times the watch for you and calculates the accuracy

Amazing! Is it a reliable measurement? Does it seem to work consistently?

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tenwhisk84

Amazing! Is it a reliable measurement? Does it seem to work consistently?

Yeah it seems to work just fine, sometimes the readings seem a little off but I trust it and assume my gut is just wrong

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I set my watch to an exact time on a specific day and come back in a week and check to see how far the time is. +5 seconds a day and you’ll be 35 seconds off, so itll definitely show. Only issue is you gotta keep the watch wound the entire time, and it takes a few days at the very least to get a decent reading

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times.a.tickin

I set my watch to an exact time on a specific day and come back in a week and check to see how far the time is. +5 seconds a day and you’ll be 35 seconds off, so itll definitely show. Only issue is you gotta keep the watch wound the entire time, and it takes a few days at the very least to get a decent reading

I never actually thought of that, it seems so intuitive!

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tenwhisk84

I never actually thought of that, it seems so intuitive!

Yeah and I do it with two watches at the same time and see which one can stay on the correct time for the longest sometimes. The things we get up to in quarantine, huh?

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times.a.tickin

Yeah and I do it with two watches at the same time and see which one can stay on the correct time for the longest sometimes. The things we get up to in quarantine, huh?

Hahahaha us watch folk are a funny bunch, quarantine or not!

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tenwhisk84

Hahahaha us watch folk are a funny bunch, quarantine or not!

Aint that the truth

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I'm using an iOS app called "Watch Tracker" and it works very well for me.  I paid some money for it and it is totally worth it.  

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sfwatchlover

I'm using an iOS app called "Watch Tracker" and it works very well for me.  I paid some money for it and it is totally worth it.  

This. It’s great for tracking the accuracy. The price is a liiiittle but too high in my opinion but the most important thing is: it works! 😃

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I agree with the comment that the best way to test the timing is to set the watch and wear it as you normally would. I set it precisely to my phone’s time or the atomic clock, and note the gain/loss at the same time every day. Obv, you don’t have to check it every day, but I do because I want to see if there’s any activity-based variance. If I test it for 5 days, for example, and show a +25 second gain, I know it’s running at +5spd. 

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I agree with the other comments in terms of setting the watch precisely to a known accurate atomic time source, and then checking it to note the gain/loss after wearing it for a defined period of time (at least 24 hours).

I use an Android app called "Atomic Clock & Watch Accuracy Tool (with NTP Time)" to provide the reference time source.  I like it since it has an option to provide the Greenwich Time Signal as the next minute approaches, so you get an audible cue as well. It also shows you how much your phones time is off from the atomic time signal.  Another option is the Watchville app, which  also includes a time source synced to an atomic clock. There are lots of others available for either Android or Apple. You can also use the "time.is" web site if you don't want to load any app on your phone.

One thing to consider is that the rate will vary depending on how the watch is oriented (dial up, dial down, crown up, crown down, crown right, crown left). By wearing the watch, and comparing the time deviation against a known accurate atomic time source, you can get a "real world" indication which is more meaningful (at least in my opinion) than a reading from a TimeGrapher.  On the wrist, my GMT Master II gains about 1 second every 3 days, but on the TimeGrapher some positions show a gain while others show a loss, and all show a deviation of between 1-2 SPD.

 



 

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There is an iPhone app called WatchTracker that I use and like. You can follow multiple watches, and its very easy to track accuracy over time with lots of cool statistics.