To Service or Not to Service?

I recently got gifted my Grandfather's early 60's Omega Seamaster (Linen Dial) in excellent condition. The watch has sat in a desk for at least the last 20 years and yet it still runs! Its last service could be over 40 years ago. It runs about 1 minute fast per day and the date and crown engagement seem strong. I believe it has the caliber 562 but have not confirmed that yet. My question is if I should service it or not based on the goals below?

  1. Keep the watch in working order for generations after me.

  2. Be able to wear it occasionally without fear.

Thanks for any input you have!

Edit based on the comments thus far: it obviously should be serviced, but I watched a video from Adrian Barker where he had the “same” watch and omega recommended he not service it which surprised me.

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Yes - it's time.

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If you find someone you trust to service it and are able to comfortably pay for it, I'd service it. Just movement and gaskets. Refreshing the lubrication and gaskets will help keep it from being harmed or harming itself by running.

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Yes it's time and yes find a qualified watchmaker.

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If you plan to wear it I would have it serviced. But I have my grandfather's retirement watch that has never been serviced. It was nos when I got it. A gold watch was not his style. I have worn it 3-4 times the past couple of years. I should have it serviced. I have stopped wearing my Omega dirty dozen watch til I have it serviced. I need to drop it off this week.

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I would if I were going to wear it

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Service it! It’s a family heirloom and can be passed on.

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Other than the cost, why would you not service the watch that's off by a minute a day?

If cost is the barrier, save up to get it done and don't wear or wind the watch until it's serviced.

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I've said many times, only service once a watch once it doesn't run properly.

BUT... Not in this case.

In this case, with such an old movement where sourcing parts can be an issue, I'd really recommend a proactive approach. The ounce of prevention versus the pound of cure.

I'd also keep an eye out for other calibers, or old watches with the same caliber (even if broken) for donor movements in the future.

Find an independent watchmaker and build a good relationship - or take this one to Omega.

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Beautiful watch, by the way!! Truly a stunner!

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This shouldn't even be a question. Leave it alone until it has been looked at by a qualified watchmaker or even Omega.

But kudos to you for simply asking a question rather than turning this into another needless poll.

Good luck!!

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Beautiful heirloom and its time...

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If you want to wear it, I would at least have the seals changed. But while you're having that done ... Might as well do a full service on the movement.

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I would. I used watch art exchange

Recently for my PO. They did a great job on it at a fair price.

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Something worth keeping is something worth taking care of...

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I would recommend that you speak directly to Omega

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Send it over

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Service it.

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Yes, be daft not to

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Service

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Service it, you will regret it if something breaks. This is not just another watch

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This tells a story ❤️

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Like any mechanical device, lubricant and seals will degrade and wear particles will contaminate the inside.

Also modern synthetic lubricants are far superior to the 'old' mineral based.

For me it's like not servicing your car. Eventually the repair bill will dwarf servicing costs.

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Service it, find someone good, pay them what they’re worth. Most importantly, enjoy that beautiful watch and think you too are going to have the chance to pass it on one day. Lovely.

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The oils used fornlubrication will have dried up. Any fine particles that may have made their way into the case can actually act like sand paper, wearing down the parts.

I cannot think of any reason to not get the watch serviced. Not restored. Just disassembled, cleaned, reassembled/lubricated, and gaskets replaced.

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Of course, but find a good watchmaker to do it.

Beautiful #vintage #omega