Sea-Gull Officially Launches a 1963 Edition with a Transparent Caseback

According to friends at Sea-Gull, in response to the high demand from 1963 watch enthusiasts and collectors who wish to admire the splendor of the ST19 movement through a transparent caseback, Sea-Gull officials have finally launched a 1963 edition with a transparent caseback.

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The Sea-Gull 1963 Wind Chaser series adopts the ST1901 movement, inheriting the lineage of the Original Sea-Gull 1963 edition. Drawing inspiration from the flight watch design blueprints in the Sea-Gull Watch Museum's collection, it carries on the aviation spirit of the Original Sea-Gull 1963 edition - with a purely tough, retro style. Go to windy places to explore, as one who chases the wind.

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The dial uses a graded sparkle pattern, displaying a sense of hierarchical texture; matched with the classic serpentine hands and sharp, eye-catching luminous numeric markers, the glow gets brighter as night falls. The chronograph buttons have a radiating texture design, tough and retro, exceptionally stylish.

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The transparent caseback fully reveals the mechanical beauty of the ST1901 movement, making it a timeless masterpiece. Here you can compare the differences between the Original 1963 edition, the 1963 Times and the Wind Chaser series - very much worth getting your hands on.

Reply

Boo! Cover up! Boo!

Okay, this is less silly than usual as there is no peek-a-boo rotor blocking things and a chrono has more intricate guts.

I had a display back provided with my Plan B, and bought one from HKED for my FKJB, so I don't see it as a big selling point.

I don't like the font on the numerals, and the China Air Force script is too large. Actually the whole dial seems unbalanced.

On their video (and your picture) I noticed the bridge still has the movement number etched in, which I like. I don't think any of the non-Seagull versions have that.

Cantaloop

I had a display back provided with my Plan B, and bought one from HKED for my FKJB, so I don't see it as a big selling point.

I don't like the font on the numerals, and the China Air Force script is too large. Actually the whole dial seems unbalanced.

On their video (and your picture) I noticed the bridge still has the movement number etched in, which I like. I don't think any of the non-Seagull versions have that.

You raise some fair critiques about the new Sea-Gull 1963 reissue. As a collector myself, I appreciate the display caseback but agree it's not a huge selling point given the availability of aftermarket options.

The font and sizing on the dial design is certainly subjective. I can see how you'd find it unbalanced with the large Air Force script. Personally, I don't mind the stylized numerals but can understand it comes down to individual preference.

Good catch on the movement etching! I also appreciate those small original details on the bridge. It's a shame if other brands replace the Sea-Gull marking with their own. To me, that historical engraving is part of what gives the ST19 charm and significance as an early Chinese chronograph movement.

At the end of the day, no reissue will satisfy every collector's tastes. We all seek different traits in the 1963 chronograph. I'm just glad Sea-Gull continues producing this classic watch, preserving its heritage while bringing small modern updates. It was overdue for an official transparent caseback option.

Seagull must be pissed at all the homage clone Chinese brands. They make great watches. Some nice original designs. But,some people will walk away from them because the term Chinese Watch is associated with those other guys. Sad

WristCounselor

Seagull must be pissed at all the homage clone Chinese brands. They make great watches. Some nice original designs. But,some people will walk away from them because the term Chinese Watch is associated with those other guys. Sad

You raise an excellent point. As a long-time Sea-Gull collector, I truly believe they make some of the best Chinese watches, built upon decades of mechanical watchmaking expertise since the 1950s. It is a shame their reputation gets tainted by the flood of homage watches from mushroom brands.

Sea-Gull continues to focus on innovative and authentic designs, such as the iconic 1963 chronograph, and more recently, the ST8080 series with intricate enamel dials. These demonstrate Chinese watchmaking at its finest.

However, you are right that some consumers unfairly dismiss Sea-Gull due to negative perceptions of Chinese watches being cheap clones or homages. This oversight pains me as a fan who has enjoyed the quality and history behind the Sea-Gull name for many years.

My hope is that more watch appreciators will give Sea-Gull a chance to see past the "Chinese watch" stereotype. Once people experience the craftsmanship first-hand, they tend to gain immense respect for this heritage brand that bleeds passion into every watch they produce in Tianjin.

Waiting for mine !

alonzotang

You raise an excellent point. As a long-time Sea-Gull collector, I truly believe they make some of the best Chinese watches, built upon decades of mechanical watchmaking expertise since the 1950s. It is a shame their reputation gets tainted by the flood of homage watches from mushroom brands.

Sea-Gull continues to focus on innovative and authentic designs, such as the iconic 1963 chronograph, and more recently, the ST8080 series with intricate enamel dials. These demonstrate Chinese watchmaking at its finest.

However, you are right that some consumers unfairly dismiss Sea-Gull due to negative perceptions of Chinese watches being cheap clones or homages. This oversight pains me as a fan who has enjoyed the quality and history behind the Sea-Gull name for many years.

My hope is that more watch appreciators will give Sea-Gull a chance to see past the "Chinese watch" stereotype. Once people experience the craftsmanship first-hand, they tend to gain immense respect for this heritage brand that bleeds passion into every watch they produce in Tianjin.

Spot on. Some of your watches are amazing. And yes, this is a brand that definitely gets lumped into (unfairly) 鈥淐hinese brand鈥 negative moniker. There are a few other brands also in the same boat. I can鈥檛 think of the name right now, but there is another brand out of China that makes incredible dials.

Hmmm. New temptation. All my chronographs are meca quartz. Is it time for a mechanical chrono鈥hat I can afford? 馃

NotThatNeil

Hmmm. New temptation. All my chronographs are meca quartz. Is it time for a mechanical chrono鈥hat I can afford? 馃

As a devoted Seagull 1963 chronograph collector, I completely understand the temptation! Once you experience the precision, visual appeal and interactive feeling of a mechanical chronograph like the 1963 movement, it's hard to go back to quartz.

And that's the beauty of Seagull's pieces - you CAN afford a finely crafted in-house mechanical chrono from them. I love my higher end Swiss pieces too, but none give me the same thrill as winding my 1963 Chronicler or feeling the snappy pushers snap back. Seagull pioneered an accessible mechanical chronograph while keeping quality on par with luxury brands.

The smooth sweep, the intricate Chinese aesthetics marked "22 Zuan" showing master status, displaying the decorated ST19 column wheel movement...every detail is mesmerizing. I say go for the 1963 Wind Chaser and get ready for a new level of watch love!

HKED鈥檚 1963 is still the version for me.

Looks like Seagull saw how popular his version was and just copied the idea (transparent case back) 馃槶