My first Gold Watch

I never owned or wanted to own a gold watch. Today my dad came by and handed me this exclusive cardboard box. Right away I knew this was something magical. The cut out, the rubber band, everything screamed heirloom and economically independence.

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I must admit I was positively surprised. The watch belonged to my grand dad on my mothers side. I don't remember him wearing this and truth to be told, I have very little fond memories of him.

He passed away many years ago, and my dad somehow felt he should have it serviced back in 2019. Since then it has been sitting in a drawer until today.

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I have no idea what this is, and if it hold any value. The sentimental value to me is not that it came from my grand dad, but rather that my dad gave it to me today.

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It's 36mm and with my 19,5 wrist it looks a bit silly. I usually never go below 40mm

Anyone out there who knows what this is?

Should I quit my day job?

The Golden boy

It appears to be a 1940s-era Swiss chronograph.

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For a little more clarity you could have said a 1940s-era Swiss chronograph in GOLD 馃槉

Is it a Landeron?

Thanks....I guess

You're killing my dream of not having to work another day in my life, and on top of this, I now feel like I have homework and have to open the watch to see what's inside.

I'll be right back

You are now a Goooooooldmember

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Definitely a Landeron Calibre 48. Do be careful with it -- there's no shock protection on the balance staff jewels.

JBird7986

Definitely a Landeron Calibre 48. Do be careful with it -- there's no shock protection on the balance staff jewels.

Thank you Specialist JBird7986

That sounds VERY expensive. Any idea how many years I can live off of it?

SteenW

Thank you Specialist JBird7986

That sounds VERY expensive. Any idea how many years I can live off of it?

Services should be done about every 5-10 years or so. Just don't drop it and you should be fine.

JBird7986

It appears to be a 1940s-era Swiss chronograph.

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Sure?

mjosamannen

Sure?

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I don't speak much French, but, "Chronograph Suisse" was kind of a dead giveaway... 馃ぃ

That is a lovely watch. I say wear it and enjoy it! You might be interested to know that the 158 stamp on the caseback in the hammerhead indicates that the case was made by C茅sar Arnoux in Le Noirmont in Switzerland.

It is true that it will be more fragile than a modern watch because of its construction, especially the lack of shock protection on the balance. From personal experience I'd suggest no gardening, manual labour, sport or playing with children wearing it.

You'll also see various snobbish comments online about the "paper thin" gold case and potentially hollow lugs. While it's true that the case is thin to keep gold content low, provided you avoid the activities above you're very unlikely to damage it and you can wear it for a lifetime unlike a plated watch. If you ever do damage it a goldsmith can easily repair it.

I love the Landeron 48 and 248 movements. They're reliable workhorses. Most importantly, parts are plentiful and cheap unlike many higher end vintage chronograph movements.

Your watch looks really great! Do be wary of using steel springbars (unsure what is on yours) against a gold case like that, as the difference in hardness can cause some problems longer term :)

nichtvondiesemjahrhundert

That is a lovely watch. I say wear it and enjoy it! You might be interested to know that the 158 stamp on the caseback in the hammerhead indicates that the case was made by C茅sar Arnoux in Le Noirmont in Switzerland.

It is true that it will be more fragile than a modern watch because of its construction, especially the lack of shock protection on the balance. From personal experience I'd suggest no gardening, manual labour, sport or playing with children wearing it.

You'll also see various snobbish comments online about the "paper thin" gold case and potentially hollow lugs. While it's true that the case is thin to keep gold content low, provided you avoid the activities above you're very unlikely to damage it and you can wear it for a lifetime unlike a plated watch. If you ever do damage it a goldsmith can easily repair it.

I love the Landeron 48 and 248 movements. They're reliable workhorses. Most importantly, parts are plentiful and cheap unlike many higher end vintage chronograph movements.

This all sound right. My grand dad was the kind of man that never did a days work in his life. I remember his bike having a flat tire and him refusing me to fix the tire since I was not a "trained bicycle mechanic".

Thank you for all the insight into the watch. I am a little disappointed you didn't also include Mr. C茅sar Arnoux favourite colour and shoe size 馃槀