Timegrapher and hobby horology

Has anyone gotten to the point that they invested in a timegrapher, either to help with watch repair or just see how accurate your collection is? Was it a worthwhile investment? Curious minds want to know! LOL

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Yes, it is. I assemble automatics, primarily Seiko powered dive watches. I buy new Seiko NH35s and NH36s mostly and do regulate them using a timegrapher. While I rarely adjust the beat error of a movement if it's under .5ms with the watch face down or face-up, I have run into a few that are higher than that at other crown positions, crown down being the most challenging. I tend to have the speed of the movement at no more than +5 seconds a day, again face up or down. I have never seen a brand new movement show huge differences in either beat error or speed at different crown positions but it's nice to verify the performance and be able to tweak it.

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Definitely worth it for me. It's great for the NH movements like @fredcrook described, it's even better for Vostoks. I was able to get +1 SPD averaged across 5 positions on one of my mods.

I did. It鈥檚 definitely worth it if you鈥檙e repairing watches. Though for the relatively low price of them, I鈥檇 recommend getting one simply to check on the health of your watches.

I own one but rarely use it. I do use the android app "Watch Accuracy Meter" a lot when assessing the condition of vintage watch movements before buying when out and about or deciding whether they need a service. Its experimental setting measures amplitude as well as rate and beat error.

It makes regulating watches much easier. However, if you simply have your watches serviced, you might not need it. The entertainment value is fairly low. If you plan on modding or restoring watches, you will surely need it.

Either way, keep in mind, you are working on the most sensitive part of the watch.

Before buying a timegrapher, I suggest buying a cheap degausser which could fix a problem for about 1/20th the price.

If you are a DIY type with a fleet of mechanicals then a timegrapher will help get those watches running as good as possible, which in my case increases the enjoyment from them.

nichtvondiesemjahrhundert

I own one but rarely use it. I do use the android app "Watch Accuracy Meter" a lot when assessing the condition of vintage watch movements before buying when out and about or deciding whether they need a service. Its experimental setting measures amplitude as well as rate and beat error.

I downloaded that app as well. 馃榿

I have one and will start to regulate my NH35/6/4 builds

JustMeArnold

I downloaded that app as well. 馃榿

Keep in mind that the app is limited in its accuracy due to the nature of a cellphone's microphone. It is a nice portable tool to have if you wish to test a used mechanical before buying it, or to find a problem, but I wouldn't regulate a watch with it.