Flieger, Field! Flummoxed! 😵‍💫

Is this a Flieger or a Field Watch? What differentiates a Flieger from a Field watch? Is there a hybrid, a diver/field, or a flieger/diver? Show me your combat watch and explain to me the differences!

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I am pretty sure it’s a Seiko.👍

+200 points for unhelpful, useless comment. 😉

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personally i think flieger is also a field watch for air force. looking at the history both watch are meant to be wear by soldier for the war. while the standart field watch is for the ground force, the flieger is for the air force. funny think is i made the same mistake back in my early days of collection, i collect one watch for every category and after i bought the laco aachen (flieger type b) i also bought a snk809. after a few weeks i realized they got the same dial layout (minute outside, hour inside)

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fortunately seiko released the srpg series which has 12-24 hour dial. long story short i sold the snk and bought the srpg and use it on daily basis

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Realistically, with modern sized watches until you get into the pilot's chronographs there is pretty much zero difference between a field watch and a flieger. The characteristics that make a good pilot's watch are the same ones that make a good field watch. The WWII vintage 50+mm fliegers would make a bad field watch, but anything 36-42mm is easily suitable for field use.

My DS30 is a pilot's watch, but it's equally as good as a field watch.

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My Marathon Navigator looks like a field watch, with a 12 hour bezel, but it was designed for aircrew use.

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Lastly, my GSAR is a field watch dial, stuck inside a 300m diver...

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My unscientific, but totally accurate $0.02:

Flieger watch has broadsword hands (that I don’t care for). Watch size can be small, medium, giant, or even Invicta. WR nice but not critical. Should be lumed.

Field watch ( I’m fieldwalker, so you must trust me) is any sort of handset except broadsword, is small to medium size case, doesn’t weigh too much, and should have a date. The date is requisite since my phone bricks 🧱 when I’m off grid for a few days. WR 100m or more (you may go swimming or get soaked by accident) is critical. Good Lume also critical.

I don’t own a flieger but my Ginza Alpinist is a solid 200m field

pictured here in the field :

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It’s a flield

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Great question - what time period are we talking about?

Here are some different examples from my collection that were designed or modified for aeronautic military use...

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Here are some of my military field watch examples...

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Let me know when you figure it out. I’m all confused now.🤪

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Here is a Benrus Type II homage, the Benrus Type II, to me is a field diver... Diver case and specs, field dial.

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Most of my watches are field watches though... 😬

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/dadjoke 😜

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I have the same doubt as you with my SNK809. I think it's a hybrid, the dial looks like a flieger but with a field watch case.

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Seiko calls them Field Street Style 😂

But the Type B dial has been historically related to the Flieger style.

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Two from Islander Watch co. Both fit the pilot field/diver cross over I think.

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Highly legible and durable with a timer facility - perfect go anywhere watch!

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Unless you feel the urge to cross the channel at night in a Junkers, you're not wearing a Flieger watch, but something with a Flieger-style dial.

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During WWII when the U.S. produced nearly identical watches for the army, navy, and army air corps, the field (ORD DEPT), pilot (A-11 Navigation Hack), and dive (BUSHIPS) watches had slightly different specs. Compared to the ORD DEPT watches, the A-11 needed magnetic resistance (to operate around the magnetic fields produced by aircraft engines) and better accuracy. The BUSHIPS needed lume, a soldered-on crystal, and a screw-on cap sealing the crown. All had Arabic numerals now associated with field watches.

Modern pilot watches generally descend from the German flieger A and B designs of WWII.

Modern dive watches generally descend from the post-war Blancpain 50 Fathoms and the Rolex Submariner.

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Proven in real world tests, wore by every professionals, militaries, special forces, navy seals, combat pilots, fire fighters, astronauts, pilots, divers, celebrities and more.

This is the real the combat watch!!

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