Pull out crown to save battery?

Like many who've been bitten by the watch bug, I jumped in with both feet and I've quickly acquired a sizable collection. Because of this, wrist time is thinly spread out across watches. 聽And while I like the convenience of quartz watches (just grab and go), I have started to think about when it comes time to change out the batteries. 聽I've done it before, but don't look forward to it because there's always the chance of damaging something (scratches, etc). 聽

I've heard batteries typically last between 1-2 years before needing replacement (not counting Casios of course 馃槈). 聽I know it depends on features like chrono or just simple 3 hand dials. 聽But does 2 years or less sound about right?

So my main question is, does anyone pull out the crown to save on battery life when your watch is not in a short rotation of wear? 聽Is there a downside to this other than having to reset the time each time like you would an automatic? 聽Does the battery still drain anyway? 聽Would love to hear from those who've been collecting for awhile. 聽Thanks!

Apparently, it doesn't help. Which sucks.聽

BrandNewDay

Apparently, it doesn't help. Which sucks.聽

This is correct. The watch still draws from the battery despite the fact the hands aren鈥檛 moving. The only way to accomplish this is to pull out the battery.

So how come new watches have that little plastic sprue to keep the crown out? Obviously the battery drain is less when not moving stuff. It's not zero, but it's substantially less.

I do this with a few watches that are battery eaters. I always set them to 12:00:00 so I can immediately tell that they are stopped.聽

You can do it and it will probably help but isn't the beauty of quartz that it's grab and go and accurate?

In any case, be careful how you store them, with the crown out the stem is exposed and if you just toss it in a drawer or something you might bend the stem and saved yourself a better at the cost of a service ... or a new watch 馃槈

OscarKlosoff

So how come new watches have that little plastic sprue to keep the crown out? Obviously the battery drain is less when not moving stuff. It's not zero, but it's substantially less.

I do this with a few watches that are battery eaters. I always set them to 12:00:00 so I can immediately tell that they are stopped.聽

Good point!聽

This is good info, I was afraid that there still might be some drain. Just wasn't sure if it's so minimal that it would still be worth doing. But then I didn't think about damaging the crown like @MegaBob said. Sounding more like it ain't worth it 馃槕

Thanks everyone for the feedback. WC is always such a great resource 馃憦

JTinLA12

This is good info, I was afraid that there still might be some drain. Just wasn't sure if it's so minimal that it would still be worth doing. But then I didn't think about damaging the crown like @MegaBob said. Sounding more like it ain't worth it 馃槕

Thanks everyone for the feedback. WC is always such a great resource 馃憦

On top of what @MegaBob already mentioned...pulling out the crown also allows the external atmosphere to enter the watch case (e.g. humidity). So this can also cause things like premature rusting of the dial, hands and moving components. With the crown in, your watch is sealed. Things can still get in everytime you pull out the crown, but at least this way you're not leaving the door open all day long.

This of course also only matters depending on your local climate and how you store your watches. If you keep them sealed and/or in a holder of some sort you're probably fine regardless.

Last point, and the only real reason I keep my watches running, is to prevent batteries from leaking internally. If you leave them there for too long after the watch stopped they can make a mess inside the watch case. So leaving the watch running keeps my batteries stable and lets me visually know when they need to be replaced.

I pull the crown out on my Longine VHP to save the battery, the hands all move to 12 o鈥檆lock and when I wear it again I push in the crown and the hands and date automatically reset to the correct time, which is cool to watch.

tonmed

On top of what @MegaBob already mentioned...pulling out the crown also allows the external atmosphere to enter the watch case (e.g. humidity). So this can also cause things like premature rusting of the dial, hands and moving components. With the crown in, your watch is sealed. Things can still get in everytime you pull out the crown, but at least this way you're not leaving the door open all day long.

This of course also only matters depending on your local climate and how you store your watches. If you keep them sealed and/or in a holder of some sort you're probably fine regardless.

Last point, and the only real reason I keep my watches running, is to prevent batteries from leaking internally. If you leave them there for too long after the watch stopped they can make a mess inside the watch case. So leaving the watch running keeps my batteries stable and lets me visually know when they need to be replaced.

I actually doubt this is true for a pull out type crown.

I have one quartz, mr jones. Very much a summer watch. It will probably aid in battery life, so I鈥檝e pulled it out as well.

u_n_d_y

I actually doubt this is true for a pull out type crown.

I have one quartz, mr jones. Very much a summer watch. It will probably aid in battery life, so I鈥檝e pulled it out as well.

Depends on the watch... Some pull out crowns still have seals, they're just not as tight or obvious. This is also evident in the fact some watches with pull out crowns are rated for 5 to 10atm, even if people won't actually put them to that test. Maybe some seal both in and out?

Again, it's not something you'll notice in a few days, or a few weeks, maybe a few months and really depending on the conditions. You would likely see at least dust accumulate if you leave a watch outside with it's crown pulled most of time.

It also only matters if you're obsessive about this sort of stuff, some are more than others. You can guess which camp I fall in :)

Others have already hit on the main talking points. Batteries are so cheap and easy to replace, I would like that time tick away.聽

AllTheWatches

Others have already hit on the main talking points. Batteries are so cheap and easy to replace, I would like that time tick away.聽

Yea, I agree. 聽My concern was mainly the chance of scratching the case up or messing anything up inside when I have to change the battery. 聽I've changed batteries before, but just would prefer to not to have to open cases up as often if I don't have to. 聽Was just a thought 馃槙

JTinLA12

Yea, I agree. 聽My concern was mainly the chance of scratching the case up or messing anything up inside when I have to change the battery. 聽I've changed batteries before, but just would prefer to not to have to open cases up as often if I don't have to. 聽Was just a thought 馃槙

That is fair, when I had more quartz than I currently do, I did not have the right tools for every case type.聽

It does save some battery power because the hand's motor isn't switching on. IMO it's also a bit pointless because the main advantage of a quartz watch is that it's always on the correct time when you pull it on your wrist.

I remember reading technical data on some Miyota movements stating they will drain at ~30% when the crown is pulled. I don't know if it applies to other movements but specifically Miyota 6S50 and others. Some of my Fossil watches have this feature.