Couple of recent lessons learned...

As they say, your mileage may vary.  But here are some recent mishaps/mis-buys that have added to my knowledge base.  At least, my knowledge of myself.

Tissot:  I have been through a variety of Tissots during the past year or so.  I really, really wanted to love Tissot and have a relationship with them, as I do with eg Orient, Omega, Cartier.  This is probably bc my first love when I circled back to watches was my ex-husband's old Tissot..I adored its old-school size, typeface, etc.  Doing research, I fell in love with the heritage and what seemed to be the value proposition.

But IRL, nothing connected the way I wanted it to.  And it wasn't the design language, which I love.  Watch after watch just felt cheap to me, and no matter what I tried -- even my first "ladies" watch-- just looked badly proportioned on me.  

I have been through the PRX 35 (so sad!  Looked beyond wonderful in pix!); the gentleman and it's "lady" equivalent; Le Locle and Carson; PRX Chrono.  All sent back, which makes me feel like a prime tire-kicker. 

As always, not a reflection on anyone else's own taste/perceptions.  But I think the brand is now a no-go for me 😕 Sad. 

Seagull 1963:  I loved this in photos, and I loved it out of the box.  And yes, I bought the official one, just to try and make sure it would be as well made as possible.  And then...I wore it to the barn.  I'm going to give the watch the benefit of the doubt, and give myself a hard smack.  The barn is the dirtiest place on earth, between the constant influx of nasty micro-dirt (horse poop! shavings! fly poop! hay!) and the incessant dampness from a million gallons of horse-pee in the air.  Filthy, filthy, filthy.  But still, can't help but suspect a basic Seiko might have at least been repairable if it had had a bad reaction.  The Seagull died a spectacular death, with the entire face turning cattywampus.  A hand might have fallen off, too. (It has been awhile now; took a bit for me to admit to)

Again, just my own experience and dumbness.  It's an adorable watch.  But if it's in your watch box or watch list, just make sure it isn't your GADA-- I don't think it's really that rugged. 

 Seiko 6923-8080:  Seiko fangirl, for sure.  And also vintage fangirl.  But the two together are tricky here, maybe.  I LOVE this watch.  But it also has that rattle-y flimsy quality that makes it sometimes --ok, often-- annoying to wear.  That's Seiko, right?  But really, that is often old Seiko, since I don't feel this as much with new Seiko.  I continue to lust after some vintage Seiko.  But they always drop to the bottom of the list because it may be that I like them more on the page than on the wrist.  

What are some of your own lessons learned?  

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Thanks for sharing. The seagull movement is too noisy for me (in the Sugess). Put up with it initially but now I can't really wear it.

Casioak black is nice... But I can't read the time very easily! Again, initially I was ok with it but now I'm not wearing it much. 

Lessons learned 🤷🏾‍♂️

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Yeah, it was noisy--that was disappointing, too.  Forgot about that in the killing-debacle.

And I had the same thought about the Casioak.  Love the look, and certainly barn-worthy.  But I can barely read in a photo, and am pretty sure it would go the same way for me 😕

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Lessons learned...  

I remember reading "Stumbling On Happiness" by Daniel Gilbert, and he points out that all the research shows that we are entirely unable to predict what will make us happy.  That is, we sit and imagine, and we totally convince ourselves that, "if only I achieve X, I will be forever more happy."  But, turns out that we have about a 50/50 chance of actually correctly predicting!  Like, we are akin to strangers to ourselves!

That was certainly my experience with watches.  

  • I started out crazy for Porsche Design, because I was a car guy, and who doesn't love Porsche?  But, just too utilitarian for me
  • Breitling!  That's where it's at!  Turns out... I really am not that into chronographs!
  • Chinese fakes!  I mean, why pay $6k for a watch when you can get the same thing for $300 with a reliable Miyota movement from China?  They're fun as gag gifts, and it's always a hoot to show off a fake and have everyone oooh and ahhhh over how realistic the "rep" is, but it loses its novelty very quickly
  • Micro brands!  Why pay $6k for a watch when there are all these amazing micro brands out there offering the same specs if not better?  Turns out I don't care a whit about specs.  The only thing I care about is finishing and how shiny a watch is!
  • Omega!  Best finishing out there from a Swiss manufacturer with massive economies of scale, that offers highly reliable and well-manufactured watches, with the best conceivable technology (co-axial escapement, anti-magnetic, etc., etc.)  Well, sure, the best Swiss...  but, turns out there's more than one country to produces watches!  Who knew???
  • Grand Seiko!  Massive economies of scale, lean manufacturing techniques, leverages know-how from their vast conglomerate, including semi-conductor manufacturing!  And shiny, shiny, shiny!  

Looking back over all my "learnings," I wonder when I'm going to turn my back on GS?  I mean, I'm like Larry King when it comes to watches!  I'm sure each time he's gotten remarried, he's convinced himself, "Okay, NOW this is the one!"  8 marriages and counting!

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HotWatchChick69

Lessons learned...  

I remember reading "Stumbling On Happiness" by Daniel Gilbert, and he points out that all the research shows that we are entirely unable to predict what will make us happy.  That is, we sit and imagine, and we totally convince ourselves that, "if only I achieve X, I will be forever more happy."  But, turns out that we have about a 50/50 chance of actually correctly predicting!  Like, we are akin to strangers to ourselves!

That was certainly my experience with watches.  

  • I started out crazy for Porsche Design, because I was a car guy, and who doesn't love Porsche?  But, just too utilitarian for me
  • Breitling!  That's where it's at!  Turns out... I really am not that into chronographs!
  • Chinese fakes!  I mean, why pay $6k for a watch when you can get the same thing for $300 with a reliable Miyota movement from China?  They're fun as gag gifts, and it's always a hoot to show off a fake and have everyone oooh and ahhhh over how realistic the "rep" is, but it loses its novelty very quickly
  • Micro brands!  Why pay $6k for a watch when there are all these amazing micro brands out there offering the same specs if not better?  Turns out I don't care a whit about specs.  The only thing I care about is finishing and how shiny a watch is!
  • Omega!  Best finishing out there from a Swiss manufacturer with massive economies of scale, that offers highly reliable and well-manufactured watches, with the best conceivable technology (co-axial escapement, anti-magnetic, etc., etc.)  Well, sure, the best Swiss...  but, turns out there's more than one country to produces watches!  Who knew???
  • Grand Seiko!  Massive economies of scale, lean manufacturing techniques, leverages know-how from their vast conglomerate, including semi-conductor manufacturing!  And shiny, shiny, shiny!  

Looking back over all my "learnings," I wonder when I'm going to turn my back on GS?  I mean, I'm like Larry King when it comes to watches!  I'm sure each time he's gotten remarried, he's convinced himself, "Okay, NOW this is the one!"  8 marriages and counting!

When email was new a friend of mine who is now a law professor and I would email back and forth and we always used the style of Larry King's newspaper column:

"That Loni Anderson, she is such a great actress...and a looker,

I have been thinking about cheese, I like it...

Co-axial escapement, radial friction is the best friction..."

I have learned that, for me, 32-37mm is the ideal case size, no matter what my wrist size. I prefer white dials to every other color. Leather straps are my best option. With anything else, I fidget.

When I ignore these basic truths about myself I have watches that I must move on from.

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Here's a couple things about myself and watches (very nice watches) that didn't work out for me in terms of my watch journey...

Rolex OP: Beautiful and solid watch, but ran consistently at +12 sec/day even after a service. My Tissot, Mido, Sinn, and Seiko all run 3-5 sec/day at most. Also, for my lifestyle and position in life I felt awkward and pretentious each time I wore it.

Tudor Pelagos: Another beautiful and solid watch that ran an acceptable (for me) +3-7 sec/day, but just felt too thick to be comfortable on my wrist. Also, my Mido, Citizen, and Casio dive watches cover everything I'm going to need as a hard core desk diver.

I have decided that having a luxury, even if it's entry level luxury, watch just isn't practical for my budget and my life situation comfort level. I get just as much, if not more enjoyment from my modest to mid level watches and living vicariously online through the pictures and stories of other dedicated watch people. 

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Got me an Omega Seamaster 300 blue dial because I love Omega and also 007 and I really like blue.

Turns out I don't like blue 007 Omega's as much as I thought. Kept it for about 10 years before I could admit to myself that it just wasn't me. 🤷

Still want to get another Seamaster , but it will be an old black or possibly white dial with  solid sword hands. Mon of that skeletonised nonsense.😄

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HotWatchChick69

Lessons learned...  

I remember reading "Stumbling On Happiness" by Daniel Gilbert, and he points out that all the research shows that we are entirely unable to predict what will make us happy.  That is, we sit and imagine, and we totally convince ourselves that, "if only I achieve X, I will be forever more happy."  But, turns out that we have about a 50/50 chance of actually correctly predicting!  Like, we are akin to strangers to ourselves!

That was certainly my experience with watches.  

  • I started out crazy for Porsche Design, because I was a car guy, and who doesn't love Porsche?  But, just too utilitarian for me
  • Breitling!  That's where it's at!  Turns out... I really am not that into chronographs!
  • Chinese fakes!  I mean, why pay $6k for a watch when you can get the same thing for $300 with a reliable Miyota movement from China?  They're fun as gag gifts, and it's always a hoot to show off a fake and have everyone oooh and ahhhh over how realistic the "rep" is, but it loses its novelty very quickly
  • Micro brands!  Why pay $6k for a watch when there are all these amazing micro brands out there offering the same specs if not better?  Turns out I don't care a whit about specs.  The only thing I care about is finishing and how shiny a watch is!
  • Omega!  Best finishing out there from a Swiss manufacturer with massive economies of scale, that offers highly reliable and well-manufactured watches, with the best conceivable technology (co-axial escapement, anti-magnetic, etc., etc.)  Well, sure, the best Swiss...  but, turns out there's more than one country to produces watches!  Who knew???
  • Grand Seiko!  Massive economies of scale, lean manufacturing techniques, leverages know-how from their vast conglomerate, including semi-conductor manufacturing!  And shiny, shiny, shiny!  

Looking back over all my "learnings," I wonder when I'm going to turn my back on GS?  I mean, I'm like Larry King when it comes to watches!  I'm sure each time he's gotten remarried, he's convinced himself, "Okay, NOW this is the one!"  8 marriages and counting!

I kept my original post a bit brief, but I've gone down each of these same paths that you have.  And I did my first GS spin quickly--the SBGW 231 which I found too beige, too thick, and too damn shiny (scratch-phobia emerged).  However, I'm circling back around for another in the not-too-distant future. 

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Aurelian

When email was new a friend of mine who is now a law professor and I would email back and forth and we always used the style of Larry King's newspaper column:

"That Loni Anderson, she is such a great actress...and a looker,

I have been thinking about cheese, I like it...

Co-axial escapement, radial friction is the best friction..."

I have learned that, for me, 32-37mm is the ideal case size, no matter what my wrist size. I prefer white dials to every other color. Leather straps are my best option. With anything else, I fidget.

When I ignore these basic truths about myself I have watches that I must move on from.

😂😂😂 I only know Larry King by sight, but if that was his discourse? Golden comedy fodder.  

Actually, your watch parameters are pretty much exactly mine. (Pinky GS aside, and I am a bracelet girl by preference, although some watches need a strap.)   And fidget/sell off is exactly the cha-cha I do.  

Why can't I accept this about myself?  I have my wardrobe down to a fidget-free uniform, but the watches just tickle something in my greedy brain. 

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Droptuned83

Got me an Omega Seamaster 300 blue dial because I love Omega and also 007 and I really like blue.

Turns out I don't like blue 007 Omega's as much as I thought. Kept it for about 10 years before I could admit to myself that it just wasn't me. 🤷

Still want to get another Seamaster , but it will be an old black or possibly white dial with  solid sword hands. Mon of that skeletonised nonsense.😄

yeah, that admitting part....

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Tissot:  I have been through a variety of Tissots during the past year or so.  I really, really wanted to love Tissot and have a relationship with them, as I do with eg Orient, Omega, Cartier.  This is probably bc my first love when I circled back to watches was my ex-husband's old Tissot..I adored its old-school size, typeface, etc.  Doing research, I fell in love with the heritage and what seemed to be the value proposition.

But IRL, nothing connected the way I wanted it to.  And it wasn't the design language, which I love.  Watch after watch just felt cheap to me, and no matter what I tried -- even my first "ladies" watch-- just looked badly proportioned on me.

I felt the same way when I first came across Tissot, but I quickly realized that in the end the price, especially the grey market price, tells a lot about how desirable a watch actually is, and there is quite a difference between Tissot and Longines, for example.

Granted, I bought a Tissot PRX last year, but I really liked the design, and Tissot definitely delivered in that regard. But of course you can tell the price category this brand is focused on.

My lessons?

  • Spec-sheets will tell you hardly anything beyond the movement type, the case diameter, lug-to-lug and strap size. 
  • Water resistance is futile. 
  • There is no shame in ordering an inexpensive homage watch in order to find out if a certain style of watch would fit your style.
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First, I love the use of the term catty wampus.

Second, I agree with you.  Tissot is the ultimate "you get exactly what you pay for watch.". This is not to say it is bad.  It is, in fact, great.  But you can feel the areas where they've economized in order to deliver design.  Its all good as long as you know what you're getting into.

Third, I think my great lesson of the past couple years has been to learn how to appreciate without owning.  There was once in my life when I bought virtually every watch I had even an inkling I wanted.  It took a long while for me to realize that there was little joy in that for me because there are some types of watches I won't ever really reach for (fliegers, field watches, excessively complicated watches).

It has been a long slimming down period since. 

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hbein2022

Tissot:  I have been through a variety of Tissots during the past year or so.  I really, really wanted to love Tissot and have a relationship with them, as I do with eg Orient, Omega, Cartier.  This is probably bc my first love when I circled back to watches was my ex-husband's old Tissot..I adored its old-school size, typeface, etc.  Doing research, I fell in love with the heritage and what seemed to be the value proposition.

But IRL, nothing connected the way I wanted it to.  And it wasn't the design language, which I love.  Watch after watch just felt cheap to me, and no matter what I tried -- even my first "ladies" watch-- just looked badly proportioned on me.

I felt the same way when I first came across Tissot, but I quickly realized that in the end the price, especially the grey market price, tells a lot about how desirable a watch actually is, and there is quite a difference between Tissot and Longines, for example.

Granted, I bought a Tissot PRX last year, but I really liked the design, and Tissot definitely delivered in that regard. But of course you can tell the price category this brand is focused on.

My lessons?

  • Spec-sheets will tell you hardly anything beyond the movement type, the case diameter, lug-to-lug and strap size. 
  • Water resistance is futile. 
  • There is no shame in ordering an inexpensive homage watch in order to find out if a certain style of watch would fit your style.

I do find, though, that I am happy with my Seikos or my Orients despite their low prices.  

I have learned more about fit over time, and focus more now on lug-to-lug.  But other than these points, agreed.  I think feel means a lot to me (actual, material feel), and there is nothing like holding a watch to see how that stacks up.  

I've been Longines-curious, but after Tissot was not sure they would deliver, either.  But based on what you've written, maybe a big step up and worth looking into....

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Edge168n

First, I love the use of the term catty wampus.

Second, I agree with you.  Tissot is the ultimate "you get exactly what you pay for watch.". This is not to say it is bad.  It is, in fact, great.  But you can feel the areas where they've economized in order to deliver design.  Its all good as long as you know what you're getting into.

Third, I think my great lesson of the past couple years has been to learn how to appreciate without owning.  There was once in my life when I bought virtually every watch I had even an inkling I wanted.  It took a long while for me to realize that there was little joy in that for me because there are some types of watches I won't ever really reach for (fliegers, field watches, excessively complicated watches).

It has been a long slimming down period since. 

Har-- me, too.  I may be channeling a 94 year old farmer from the midwest.

I like that encapsulation of Tissot, and I will leave them there without bitterness or regret. I think for me it will be: great design; execution not quite for me.

I can do that!  Oh, so very well when it comes down to watches I really don't want to own. These are almost always very high end, and will be covered in another very episode of Fracas's Life here on our very own WC...Very important stuff, and there will be a quiz.

But the ones I MIGHT want to own?  Rather a sticky wicket, I'm afraid (now channeling Hugh Grant?).  I simply, it seems, must experience these in the metal.  I'm getting a bit better, and I don't keep them around if it's not love at first sight.  But I do make a lot of trips to the UPS Store.  And the parking there is just brutal...