Is it okay to haggle for a new watch(Say from a store like "Goldsmiths") and how does one go about haggling in a polite/reasonable manner?

I was curious whether people have successfully haggled for a new watch, how much lower did you get the price and what(if any) advice/tips would you give for someone trying to haggle? 

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I managed to scrape £200 off my zenith defy from EJ in London. Had a long conversation with the lady serving me and basically told her I was 90% there. Asked if there was anything they could do to get me over the line. 
the thing is I was actually ready to walk away and I think they gathered that. If they knew I was buying either way, I think they would have stayed firm on the price. 

So just be honest and don’t be shy in staying where your limit is price wise. Worst case is they’ll say no. 

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I got 15% off my Tissot PRX Powermatic 80 and my Seiko Presage Arita Porcelain. For the Tissot, I got it at Jared, and I think they are super flexible with prices there. After I bought the Tissot, the rep told me he can get me 15% off any Swiss movement and 25% off any Omega because they stopped being an Omega AD and still had inventory. For the Presage, I went to a different AD and asked them if they could do 20% off. The rep went into the back and came back with 15% so I bought it. But these are both cheaper models that I would feel purchasing from Jomashop, so it’s easy for me to walk away if they don’t give me the price I want.

As for phrasing, “would you be able to do X?” “what’s the best price you can do on this?” and if you’re really polite, ”are there any price considerations?” I find it’s most effective to start at a competitive, un-insulting price you’d be happy with, multiply that by 90% and ask for that and negotiate back up.

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I was in the Omega boutique here locally yesterday and I was looking at an Aqua Terra. After discussing the watch and trying it on, I asked if it was possible to get a discount. The man told me sometimes they would do it for in store only and he would go talk to his manager if I wanted to buy today. Previously, I've been told the boutique stores never do. My point is is never hurts to ask. 

I also think it depends on what you are trying to buy. If you get "the call" at the Rolex dealer, forget about it. Don't ever try. I've also had zero luck with Tudor. If you are looking for a PP or an AP and try to discuss a discount they'll probably throw you out of the store. Almost everything else, it's certainly worth asking. That being said, there are some AD's that simply don't discount, so don't be surprised if they tell you no. Doesn't mean you shouldn't ask.

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K.evin

I got 15% off my Tissot PRX Powermatic 80 and my Seiko Presage Arita Porcelain. For the Tissot, I got it at Jared, and I think they are super flexible with prices there. After I bought the Tissot, the rep told me he can get me 15% off any Swiss movement and 25% off any Omega because they stopped being an Omega AD and still had inventory. For the Presage, I went to a different AD and asked them if they could do 20% off. The rep went into the back and came back with 15% so I bought it. But these are both cheaper models that I would feel purchasing from Jomashop, so it’s easy for me to walk away if they don’t give me the price I want.

As for phrasing, “would you be able to do X?” “what’s the best price you can do on this?” and if you’re really polite, ”are there any price considerations?” I find it’s most effective to start at a competitive, un-insulting price you’d be happy with, multiply that by 90% and ask for that and negotiate back up.

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Stunning watches and I appreciate the advice with the examples. The watch I have an eye on is £2080 with a bracelet, I thought that trying to go for £1900 wouldn't sound too far fetched/low bally.

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Jklotz

I was in the Omega boutique here locally yesterday and I was looking at an Aqua Terra. After discussing the watch and trying it on, I asked if it was possible to get a discount. The man told me sometimes they would do it for in store only and he would go talk to his manager if I wanted to buy today. Previously, I've been told the boutique stores never do. My point is is never hurts to ask. 

I also think it depends on what you are trying to buy. If you get "the call" at the Rolex dealer, forget about it. Don't ever try. I've also had zero luck with Tudor. If you are looking for a PP or an AP and try to discuss a discount they'll probably throw you out of the store. Almost everything else, it's certainly worth asking. That being said, there are some AD's that simply don't discount, so don't be surprised if they tell you no. Doesn't mean you shouldn't ask.

Appreciate the reply and advice. In a weird sort of way, thankfully I don't think I will be ever buying a PP, AP or even Rolex to be honest. (I'd probably get my hand cut off and it stolen :P) I keep eyeing and seeing the new Longines 37mm Spirit and am thinking of getting it in a few years but I find it hard to convince myself to spend over £2000 on a watch(even £300 to be honest). But I keep chipping away and have a small saving sidepot going which I add a little each month :)

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Federico did a good video on this. Kind of mirrors how Ive approachEd getting discounts at ADs 

https://youtu.be/jKiGJH7lZMM

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Always consider the environment; eg. is it a seller's market? What's my own position? After that it takes two to make a deal. Both parties are always free to walk away, so be polite, don't lowball (too much), and you'll be just fine. I'm of haggling breed, so it's second nature to me. When friends who hesitate ask for advice, I remind them to calculate what an even moderate discount is in their, personal, hourly wage after taxes. This often make a very good incentive! 

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ALWAYS ask if they can see what they can do about the price. They want to sell, unless you’re after an unavailable watch.
 

Just this year:

10% off for an ORIS via an AD

3% and two new links for Omega Planet Ocean Chrono at the official Boutique

Additional strap and a buckle for Breitling Navitimer at the official Boutique

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This is something I've wondered about too. I grew up on Casio and other budget brands, and since really getting into watches a few years ago I've only ever bought online. Honestly, haggling on price in store would never have entered my head until I started reading forums and watching YouTube vids, and it still blows my mind a bit that it's the norm!

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DancingWatch

Stunning watches and I appreciate the advice with the examples. The watch I have an eye on is £2080 with a bracelet, I thought that trying to go for £1900 wouldn't sound too far fetched/low bally.

That watch is going for -17% on the grey market, so I would definitely ask for 20% off. Other examples I forgot to include was I negotiated a Grand Seiko SBGA415 down -12% but didn’t end up buying it and another AD told me he could get me a good deal on an Ulysses Nardin Freak (which I didn’t ask more about because they are $30k+), which illustrates that ADs of all price points are willing to negotiate provided the model is not popular. Making deals is common across the whole industry

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Direct quote from my dealer:

Side note, but still somewhat related, it’s funny how a lot of people don’t realize that always asking for the “best price” works in the opposite of their favor. Think about it, if I know that no matter how good of a deal I present, you will always try to work me down, I’m never incentivized to give out the best price since I know that the customer will still want a deeper discount. 

Vice versa, if I know you are no nonsense and are very likely to purchase with what I offer, I’m going to do everything I can to get the price as cheap as possible, since I know that you will actually act on it and not beat me up on price.

I’m definitely speaking for myself since it is true that many people sadly get taken advantage of, especially in a retail setting, but it’s just interesting how people think constantly beating up a dealer (not to be confused with a polite offer) is going to get you somewhere. Ok, rant over, let me find you this GS! 

He and I have a really great relationship, and the key insights he's given me is that:

  • AD sales staff just want to get the deal done
  • If they know that you're serious, that you're not going to waste their time, and they're not going to waste your time, they'll give you the lowest price to close the deal
  • If you're a sales associate, you couldn't care less how much of a discount you give out - you're paid a salary plus commission, and sometimes there are kicker bonuses.  As such, you'd be willing to discount 99% if it gets the deal done.  However, the AD sets limits on discounting and in some cases also offers higher commission percentages based on lower discounting %

If you're serious, it never hurts to ask, and just be "no nonsense" about it, and if the sales associate can do it, they'll definitely do it.  

I've gone into transactions saying, "I don't know if it's possible or not, but such-and-such dealer is offering Watch A for $XXX.  If you can match that price, I'd prefer to buy from you, and ready to pull the trigger right now."  

You can easily see what market price ($XXX) for a watch is by going onto Chrono24 and seeing what professional dealers are listing watches at.

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I managed to get 25% off a Tudor BB36 S&G ETA movement. Just be serious with your queries, dont try everything in the store in one sitting and be polite. 

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Lots of great advice here, so I do not have much to add other than always ask, unless it is an allocation based model. Research the marketplace to see what watches actually sell for. 

For example, if you are in the market for a Hamilton Intramatic and your AD is selling it for MSRP, ($2195) but Joma is selling for $1495, that lets you know where you begin negotiating. You can guarantee that the dealers are selling it for at least 20% less than what you are seeing sold with greys. Let them know you are a serious buyer and would prefer to do business locally, but noticed the watch is priced everywhere else at X#, can they match or beat? I never walked away from that discussion without a deal. 

All that said, if you go down that path, you are committed to that process, meaning if they come back and say yes, you better be prepared to buy. Otherwise, if you walk after entering into negotiating, you are never getting a deal at that dealer again and you might as well forget about getting any allocation piece. 

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"Are you able to make a price consideration?"

"Are you able to skip sales tax for out of state residents?"