When do we quit?

Most of us have watches that work fine. Is there a point where you just give up and find a different hobby? 

🤔

Also I am contractually obligated to tell you that titanium Casios are the best. 

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We don’t give in.
That’s a young man’s move.

The holy Tijuana trinity - tequila, sexo y marijuana - was far too many years ago… The good old days.

Yeap, I’m resolute.
Smooth sailing into mid-life knowing I have an interest that keeps me away from fights and skirts.

It’s healthy, some say…
And much easier to explain than a trip to Tijuana.

I’m obliged to agree, that’s a nice piece you got there 😉👌

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I have a checklist here, using a similar approach to what I mention here. The watches will definitely change over time, but the collection theme and number of watches will not

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It's a shame that the search function here is almost useless, as there was a great thread about being an enthusiast or a collector. There are negative connotations to being a collector. I don't consider myself one, except in the same way that I "collect "dust. Buying stuff is a pretty horrible hobby in my mind, though I do get the thrill of the chase and gamification of shopping. 

Anyway, there was a member who, at the time, had one (or zero?) watches and he made an eloquent argument about how one can be extremely interested in and informed about something with no ownership required. There are surely people losing their minds over the World Cup who couldn't produce a soccer ball or claim to have touched one in decades. Almost nobody owns a team. Anyway, it pains me that I can't remember that poster's screen name. 

I'm not buying that or any watch because I'm past the point of diminishing returns. And I realized that the watchmaker has four vintage pieces of mine and that eventually they'll be serviced and I'll need to pay for them.

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OscarKlosoff

It's a shame that the search function here is almost useless, as there was a great thread about being an enthusiast or a collector. There are negative connotations to being a collector. I don't consider myself one, except in the same way that I "collect "dust. Buying stuff is a pretty horrible hobby in my mind, though I do get the thrill of the chase and gamification of shopping. 

Anyway, there was a member who, at the time, had one (or zero?) watches and he made an eloquent argument about how one can be extremely interested in and informed about something with no ownership required. There are surely people losing their minds over the World Cup who couldn't produce a soccer ball or claim to have touched one in decades. Almost nobody owns a team. Anyway, it pains me that I can't remember that poster's screen name. 

I'm not buying that or any watch because I'm past the point of diminishing returns. And I realized that the watchmaker has four vintage pieces of mine and that eventually they'll be serviced and I'll need to pay for them.

Yeah good point. Watches are kinda interesting even if you only own one titanium Casio.

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The collecting impulse is hard wired into the human brain. We have been collecting odd bits since we were a species. Watches are more interesting than most things and less expensive than art.

Collecting is fine as a personality quirk, bothersome as a personality: moderation, as in all things.

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I can appreciate watches, and talk watches without the need to buy more. Right now I'm not even wearing a watch, I'm wearing a Samsung Fit2 that incidentally also has a time display. 

I find that with all new hobbies I enter a stage of burnout, because I've gone all-in. After a few weeks/months of backing-off I settle into enjoying the hobby at a more sustainable pace. You may be experiencing a similar thing, and just be a bit burnt out. 

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I’m done for now.   In terms of buying new watches…not in terms of the hobby…

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martini

I’m done for now.   In terms of buying new watches…not in terms of the hobby…

Me too 🥳 Me thinks 🤭