Watches tell stories

Kodak was founded in the late 1880s, became a giant in the photography industry in the late 1970s and filed for bankruptcy in 2012.

·

The past teaches us about the present, 

·

The Eastman Kodak Corporation invented the digital camera. I'm still not sure when the 105th Olympic games were. 

·

Kodak is such an iconic brand. Though it might be a pipe dream, I wish they would consider development on a film camera. They already license the name to other companies that produce point and shoots but if they release a 35mm fixed lens rangefinder with a decent piece of glass (f1.7-f2), I think they’d have an absolute hit on their hands. Maybe capitalizing on their past models naming like the Retina V or Retina Reflex. Film has become so popular again, Pentax has announced they are developing a film camera.

·
bevelwerks

Kodak is such an iconic brand. Though it might be a pipe dream, I wish they would consider development on a film camera. They already license the name to other companies that produce point and shoots but if they release a 35mm fixed lens rangefinder with a decent piece of glass (f1.7-f2), I think they’d have an absolute hit on their hands. Maybe capitalizing on their past models naming like the Retina V or Retina Reflex. Film has become so popular again, Pentax has announced they are developing a film camera.

And all the music my 15 year-old wants is vinyl!

·

When the Apple Watch came out, the concensus of the cognescenti was that the watch industry was history.

Today, mechanical watches, especially haute horology independents and the "Holy Trinity", are more popular than ever before. On the other end of the price spectrum, Casio continues to sell millions of watches.

So much for predictions.

·
TickyBurden

And all the music my 15 year-old wants is vinyl!

I admit I own vinyl too so perhaps I am in a small segment if folks 😂 

Shooting film on my Minolta SRT is such a different experience than digital. The heft of the camera, sound of the shutter, the feeling of pulling back the lever to advance the film… everything is so tactile and audible. The photo quality is certainly is worst and the costs are way too expensive, but the experience feels worth it as someone who just shoots for fun.

Maybe I need to just go full wacko and buy a penny-farthing to get around Seattle. 😂 

·
bevelwerks

I admit I own vinyl too so perhaps I am in a small segment if folks 😂 

Shooting film on my Minolta SRT is such a different experience than digital. The heft of the camera, sound of the shutter, the feeling of pulling back the lever to advance the film… everything is so tactile and audible. The photo quality is certainly is worst and the costs are way too expensive, but the experience feels worth it as someone who just shoots for fun.

Maybe I need to just go full wacko and buy a penny-farthing to get around Seattle. 😂 

I still have film cameras and vinyl (and cassettes) from the before times, and still listen to the audio, but haven’t used the cameras in forever. Wouldn’t even know where to take the film anymore (short of a professional studio). How expensive IS it to get a roll processed?

The penny farthing is a great idea. That way anyone who doesn’t want a three-hour lecture on how your homemade chia seed soap is the best can see you coming a mile away 😂.

·
TickyBurden

I still have film cameras and vinyl (and cassettes) from the before times, and still listen to the audio, but haven’t used the cameras in forever. Wouldn’t even know where to take the film anymore (short of a professional studio). How expensive IS it to get a roll processed?

The penny farthing is a great idea. That way anyone who doesn’t want a three-hour lecture on how your homemade chia seed soap is the best can see you coming a mile away 😂.

So many variables, but 35mm on color and depending on the photo lab , you can expect upwards of $25 per roll (36) with 4x6 prints. Definitely not something I do very often as it’s not cheap but it makes using film a very intentional/special decision whereas I can shoot whatever with my DSLR. 

·

i love an Olympic watch! Have had a few but this was the highlight..

Image
·
bevelwerks

So many variables, but 35mm on color and depending on the photo lab , you can expect upwards of $25 per roll (36) with 4x6 prints. Definitely not something I do very often as it’s not cheap but it makes using film a very intentional/special decision whereas I can shoot whatever with my DSLR. 

Wow. That IS expensive. Thanks for that info: Something I hadn’t priced out in about 20 years!

·
ChronoGuy

When the Apple Watch came out, the concensus of the cognescenti was that the watch industry was history.

Today, mechanical watches, especially haute horology independents and the "Holy Trinity", are more popular than ever before. On the other end of the price spectrum, Casio continues to sell millions of watches.

So much for predictions.

These shifts in taste can take time. The first wrist watches were introduced in the late 19th Century and it took another 70 years for the wrist watch to finally displace the pocket watch. The next time that you are in a large public gathering where there are a lot of people in their teens and twenties look to see how many are wearing watches. That generation has more bare wrists than any other in the past 100 years.

Like Elgin and Waltham, Eastman Kodak spun off profitable subsidiaries, usually connected to government contracting. The Eastman Chemical Company has been around since 1920 and is a 10 billion dollar a year business. They were spun off before bankruptcy and never had much connection to the film business.

I would bet that watch is connected in some way to the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics and the 105 represents Kodak's length of sponsorship. Just a guess.

·

Now there’s something you don’t see everyday. 

That’s from the Atlanta Olympics right? 100 years celebration of the summer games.

Very cool piece!

·
Aurelian

These shifts in taste can take time. The first wrist watches were introduced in the late 19th Century and it took another 70 years for the wrist watch to finally displace the pocket watch. The next time that you are in a large public gathering where there are a lot of people in their teens and twenties look to see how many are wearing watches. That generation has more bare wrists than any other in the past 100 years.

Like Elgin and Waltham, Eastman Kodak spun off profitable subsidiaries, usually connected to government contracting. The Eastman Chemical Company has been around since 1920 and is a 10 billion dollar a year business. They were spun off before bankruptcy and never had much connection to the film business.

I would bet that watch is connected in some way to the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics and the 105 represents Kodak's length of sponsorship. Just a guess.

You are absolutely right ✅️  It is  connected to Salt Lake City Winter Olympics

·

That watch definitely tells a story, a story of how it's almost impossible to know what time it is 🤣

·
erikswrist

That watch definitely tells a story, a story of how it's almost impossible to know what time it is 🤣

🤣🤣🤣🤣,so true